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Thread: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

  1. #151
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Hello! Grades are in from today. Please go double check me. If you did not get a ticket last Tuesday, 9-10, you have until this Friday to email me. There are about 6 of you who are turning in tickets but you are not on my roster. Please, everyone go check to make sure you have recital in your ecampus. Let me know if I can help. -Professor Logan
    Melissa Logan couldn't be bothered to know and follow the Richland Degree plan or those for the schools her students could transfer to. So, now that she has put students into dozens of hours that are over the degree plan, will not transfer, waste the hours available for financial aid and risked students having to pay out of state tuition at a 4 year Texas university we get this tripe. Richland in a desperate attempt to clean up the mess this incompetent music professor / advisor made had to create 2 sections of CE (Continuing Education) recital class. Most of the students in the music department needed to take the non-credit version. Unbelievably, there are only 8 students enrolled in the two CE sections. The other 100 or so students are in the credit section of the recital class racking up hours that most of them can't afford to be racking up. Is Logan checking the rolls for those CE recital sections or did these students fall through the cracks at advising and never get placed in any section of the required recital class for music majors?

    The Richland College Music Department is in shambles. Drastic changes need to be made to save this mess of a department!

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    Re: Future Net/FutureAdPro..First to spot a real product wins a prize.....

    National Association of Schools of Music Guidelines:<br>
    <br>
    Recruitment, Admission-Retention, Record Keeping, and Advisement<br>
    <br>
    1. Standards <br>
    a. Communications with prospective students and parents must be accurate and presented with integrity.
    <br>
    <br>
    Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan totally misrepresent everything to prospective students and their parents.&amp;nbsp; Who would want to enter a program that will force them to take dozens of hours that will not transfer, but will put the student into out of state tuition territory and exhaust their financial aid? Who would come in as a Music Technology Major when the courses in reality aren't offered at Richland?<br>
    <br>
    b. As a matter of sound educational practice, institutions recruit and admit students only to programs or curricula for which they show aptitudes and prospects for success. 71 NASM Handbook 2018-19II.H., I.<br>
    <br>
    Students at Richland are brought in to fill chairs. Many do not have the background, training, experience or work ethic to make. Students can continually skip, put in little practice time, earn failing grades, be disrespectful to faculty, miss performances, skip juries or more and get very high marks and be invited right back into ensembles, lessons and music classes. The hard truth is very few transfer successfully. Of those few success stories we have several students at Logan's Alma Mater, Midwestern State University and mine, Texas A &amp; M Commerce. One student is out at UNT and doing very well.&amp;nbsp; The recent A &amp; M grad had to fight out of state tuition.&amp;nbsp; Logan's Midwestern students can't appeal and will have to pay thousands in higher tuition due to her antics. Logozzo's 3 students that made it into his Alma Mater Capital University in Ohio in the last several years are on a full-ride in one case and the other's have scholarships to defray their private school tuition.&amp;nbsp; Hundreds of students have come through Richland in the past several years and racked up well over a hundred hours and have no Associate's Degree and are who knows where.<br>
    <br>
    c. Recruitment goals, policies, and procedures shall be ethical, controlled by the institution,compatible with the goals and objectives of the music unit, and free of practices that compensate recruiters directly on an individual or aggregate per-student-yield basis or otherwise create conflicts of interest for recruitment personnel or the institution.
    <br>
    <br>
    The recruitment at Richland fills chairs in the music department. The needs of the students are not being addressed.&amp;nbsp; Following degree plans precisely by putting students only in classes that they must have to transfer and keeping the standards high so that students have done the work necessary to succeed is not happening. Students are not given advising about realistic career options or encouraged to just take 1 ensemble they could participate meaningfully (as in the one they participated in in high school.) Every warm body that walks through the door ends up a music major or gets put into numerous music classes including recital and lessons that are not on the degree plan for the major they are pursuing.<br>
    <br>
    d. Admissions evaluation procedures and advising services must be clearly related to the goals and objectives of the institution’s music programs.
    <br>
    <br>
    The objective of the program should not be to create professional students.<br>
    <br>
    e. Admission to particular programs of music study must be correlated to the institution’s ability to provide the requisite coursework and experiences at the appropriate level for all students enrolled.
    <br>
    Strong collegiate music program with several unique course offerings and over 18 performing ensembles including Wind Symphony, Orchestra, Chamber Ensembles (Woodwind, Brass, Percussion, Strings, Piano), Chamber Singers, Women’s and Men’s Choirs, Jazz Singers, Fusion Band, and Steel Bands in a department with approximately 500 music students regularly enrolled.
    <br>
    The Richland webpages and music advisors totally misrepresent what the program can truly offer. The facilities are woefully inadequate for all the many programs advertised. The 11 rooms that are designated practice rooms are monopolized by adjunct faculty as there is nowhere else for them to teach, so the 500 enrollments have virtually nowhere to practice. Students are lured in with all kinds of talk of music ensembles and opportunities that no longer exist or do not make. 3 of the 5 choirs were removed from the schedule over the summer. Jazz improvisation once again did not make. Chamber brass did not make. One of the two jazz combos did not make.<br>
    <br>
    The choral music department at Richland College offers four ensembles covering a wide variety of musical styles.<br>
    <br>
    CHAMBER SINGERS: This is a large mixed ensemble. The choir performs a wide variety of choral styles. Audition is required.<br>
    <br>
    <font color="#ff0000">VOX FEMINA: This is a small select women’s vocal ensemble. The choir performs a wide variety of choral styles. Audition is required. (Removed from schedule)<br>
    <br>
    RICHMEN: This is a small select men’s vocal ensemble. The choir performs a wide variety of choral styles. Audition is required.&amp;nbsp; (Removed from schedule)<br>
    </font><br>
    JAZZ SINGERS: This ensemble provides students with the opportunity to study and perform jazz style choral literature. Audition is required.<br>
    <br>
    <font color="#ff0000">VOICE CLASS I: This course is for non-voice majors. It presents the principles of breathing, voice production, tone control, enunciation, and phrasing. (Class canceled)</font><br>
    <br>
    <font color="#ff0000">CHORUS: OPERA WORKSHOP Students learn and perform various opera scenes from a variety of time periods and styles. Audition is required. (Removed from schedule)</font>
    Richland is now down to 13 ensembles and many of those only made because once again instead of putting students in the 1 ensemble a semester (for a total of 4 that are transferable,) Logozzo is loading students into multiple ensembles.<br>
    <br>
    <a href="https://www.richlandcollege.edu/cd/credit/music/rlc/categories/pages/recording-arts-music-tech.aspx" target="_blank">https://www.richlandcollege.edu/cd/credit/music/rlc/categories/pages/recording-arts-music-tech.aspx</a><br>
    <br>
    <a href="https://www.richlandcollege.edu/cd/credit/music/rlc/categories/pages/recording-arts-music-tech.aspx" target="_blank">https://www.richlandcollege.edu/cd/credit/music/rlc/categories/pages/recording-arts-music-tech.aspx</a><br>
    <br>
    Zero of said classes are offered:<br>
    <a href="https://realscam.com/f16/dcccd-richland-college-music-advising-derrick-logozzo-melissa-logan-out-state-tuition-nightmare-5481-post127528/#post127528" target="_blank">https://realscam.com/f16/dcccd-richland-college-music-advising-derrick-logozzo-melissa-logan-out-state-tuition-nightmare-5481-post127528/#post127528</a><br>
    <br>
    Students have been lured in with promises of this audio tech coursework that simply doesn't exist at Richland.<br>
    <br>
    f. Student retention policies must be:(1) Appropriate to the purposes of the institution’s curricular programs;(2) Clearly defined;(3) Published for students and faculty; and(4) Applied with rigor and fairness.
    <br>
    <br>
    Anyone who is breathing will be kept in the program. I have been blessed to get some very sharp students to go to the Career Services and/or the Transfer Center and see them follow their dreams into coursework that will get them into real careers and good paying jobs despite Logan and Logozzo pushing students to stay in the program.<br>
    <br>
    g. The institution shall inform a student promptly if it is determined that he or she is not acceptable as a candidate for a degree, certificate, or diploma.
    <br>
    Students can continually skip, put in little practice time, earn failing grades, be disrespectful to faculty, miss performances, skip juries or more and get very high marks and be invited right back into ensembles, lessons and music classes. The fact that they will not be able to make a living in music and/or are not going to be able to meet the criteria to transfer and do well is totally ignored as any student that can fill a chair will be encouraged to hang on and on. As one staff member noted, the music students almost never seem to leave.<br>
    <br>
    h. The institution shall maintain accurate, up-to-date records of each student’s educational progress, including courses taken, grades, repertory studied, performances associated with degree or program requirements, and the results of other appropriate evaluations.
    <br>
    The records are ignored. Logozzo and Logan routinely put students into dozens of hours that will not transfer, but will place them in danger of paying out of state tuition and exhausting their financial aid. Students can't progress when they are overloaded with extra ensembles and lessons that aren't transferable. Degree plans are ignored as the goal seems to be to keep students in the program as long as possible.<br>
    <br>
    i. Institutional members shall maintain documents pertinent to the awarding of graduate degrees,including theses, dissertations, compositions, recital programs, and audio recordings.j. Advising must address program content, program completion requirements, potential careers or future studies, and music-specific student services consistent with the natures and purposes of music degrees and programs being offered. Institutions must provide students with written documents and advising that describe all requirements and the purposes of their programs.
    <br>
    An Associate's Degree in Music is only 60 hours, yet few ever get the degree though they have far exceeded that number of hours. Logozzo is said to still be telling students not to worry about out of state tuition. Students have not been following Richland's degree plan or Guided Pathway as the music advisors have just been loading them in as many classes as possible as the records in this humble thread clearly show. The music department is an unorganized mess with two people in charge that are doing incredible harm to the vast majority of trusting students which again is obvious from the records shared right here.<br>
    <br>
    2. Recommendations<br>
    a. Students with specific career goals should be engaged in a continuous advisement program related to their area of specialization.<br>
    <br>
    b. Advisement should reflect concern for the student’s goals and should provide assistance with the selection of courses that serve as appropriate preparation for advanced study.<br>
    c. Students should have access to information concerning specialization at the graduate level and available career options in music.
    <br>
    This humble thread shows that little of that is happening.&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&lt;br&gt;
    I. Published Materials and Websites<br>
    1. Standards<br>
    a. Published materials concerning the institution and the music unit shall be clear, accurate, and readily available.b. A catalog or similar document(s) shall be published at least biennially and shall cover:(1) Purposes.(2) Size and scope.NASM Handbook 2018-19 72II.I.(3) Curricula.(4) Faculty.(5) Administrators and trustees.(6) Locale.(7) Facilities.(8) Costs and refund policies.(9) Rules and regulations for conduct.(10) All quantitative, qualitative, and time requirements for admission, retention, and completion of programs and degrees and other credentials.(11) Descriptions for each course offered.(12) Academic calendar.(13) Grievance and appeals procedures.(14) Accreditation status with NASM and other appropriate accrediting agencies. c. Basic institutional policies for defining a credit hour must be published and readily available.
    <br>
    Really. I guess Richland didn't tell NASM that their students are on the 25 year plan......sigh.......<br>
    <br>
    d. The institution shall have transfer of credit policies that (1) are publicly disclosed, and (2) include a statement of the criteria established by the institution regarding the transfer of credit earned at another institution of higher education.
    <br>
    The music advisors routinely put students in pre-college non transferable theory, masterclasses that are turned into non transferable credit classes, numerous extra lessons and ensembles that are not on degree plans, extra music lit and composition classes and more that are not on any degree plan and not transferable.The policy is to fill chairs and brag about how big and wonderful the department is. I am demanding real change to a small focused department that deals with students and paying parents honestly and gets students fully prepared to transfer in two years with only the classes on their transcripts that are in fact transferable!
    Last edited by Soapboxmom; 09-22-2019 at 02:28 PM.

  3. #153
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Typical Richland College Music / Choir Student:
    my piano lesson teacher really be bullying me at 10 am lmao

    my mental health is a lost cause ima just sit back and let my brain rot from the inside out

    i wanna drop my piano lessons so bad so bad

    realizing that i wanna change my major to something that doesn’t require performing or talent but that’d basically mean starting school all over again so i’m just stuck now hahahahaha
    Melissa Logan has been advising this typical student. The advising is far beyond incompetent and clearly rises to the level of malfeasance. Pretty much everyone who walks through the doors ends up being turned into a music major to fill chairs in the department. The chances of making money from performing are so slim even for the immensely talented, highly motivated and hard working, so only a carefully chosen few should be placed in the music department for that degree path. Completing a music education degree is also extraordinarily demanding and requires a student with a strong music background and enormous dedication. Who would want this student to end up teaching in a public school classroom in the future?

    Logan is clearly not discussing realistic career opportunities with her students. If she did, the vast majority would take only 1 choir for enjoyment while they pursued a viable major that would lead to a paying job that would put food on the table. Richland is wasting taxpayer money and harming these students who are not getting proper advising. The students are racking up hours toward out of state tuition and exhausting hours that are eligible for financial aid. The students should first go to Career Services and the Transfer Center. If they are still determined to major in music, the music advisors should carefully screen them and only let in candidates that have the ability and work ethic to succeed.

    The National Association of Schools of Music requires that a real accredited music school only admit students to the program that and I quote "as a matter of sound educational practice, institutions recruit and admit students only to programs or curricula for which they show aptitudes and prospects for success." 4-6 hours of practice on one's principal instrument per day is the standard. Piano proficiency requires at least and hour a day or more for instrumental students and vocal majors need to be at accompanist level of playing which means several hours a day of piano for most. Richland does not have the facilities for students to practice even a fraction of that and as everyone and their dog is a major the department is a total zoo.

    Attendance is absolutely abysmal in the music classes. Students are still being way overloaded with music classes that will not transfer. Students are still not taking core classes as the degrees require. Many students being put into the program that are not serious musicians. Even after years of failing music classes and goofing around up there, Logan and Logozzo keep putting such students in music hours far beyond what will transfer or count toward any degree in order to fill chairs. "The institution shall inform a student promptly if it is determined that he or she is not acceptable as a candidate for a degree, certificate, or diploma," says NASM. I wonder what NASM would think about a choir section leader in their 6th year there with a string of failed classes and that repeated skips or comes in late for classes when they should have finished and transferred years ago? Of course those section leaders doing counting and solfege for the choir selections in the halls and all over the building is quite junior high. Music majors and competent music students pursuing other majors that participate in ensembles should practice and come to choir with the music properly prepared.

    The Richland College Music Department needs to be carefully evaluated and restructured!

    Richland College's Music Department

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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    The Richland College Music Department is in total crisis. The pictures show the state of the practice room pianos. Of those pianos in the 11 rooms that are supposed to be practice rooms (but are in reality monopolized by adjuncts to teach lessons,) most of those pianos are in horrific condition. Many are missing key covers and most are out of tune and/or making abnormal and very bothersome mechanical noises. The two piano studio pianos are also in very poor repair and need to be rebuilt. The hundreds of students in the Richland Music Department are in a program that is for all practical purposes defunct and a total waste of tax dollars. How can the claimed 500 enrollments all practice in the 11 rooms that are only available for limited hours and on pianos in this dreadful condition?





    Richland College funds are being wasted on numerous things that are not in any way necessary to get students prepared for music careers and ready to transfer to complete their degrees. The Carnival of Steel related ensemble is just another ensemble that only a percussion major can transfer. With only 4 ensemble credits taken at the Freshman and Sophomore level that can be transferred and many other ensembles needing to be taken in the rotation for a percussion major, there are almost no students that should be enrolled in that group. Many students are being placed in that group that is just more among numerous hours that won't transfer and will put them in out of state tuition. Why are students not being properly prepared to transfer? Why are the facilities and equipment such as practice rooms and pianos and so much more not being funded adequately when thousands are wasted on Carnival of Steel and other non-essential nonsense?
    A premiere DFW world music event, the 2020 Richland College Carnival of Steel Festival, is on Saturday, April 18 at Richland College in Dallas, Texas in its 17th Year!

    This year, the COS Festival will feature steel bands, percussion groups, jazz bands, and vocal jazz groups from around the U.S. in a free concert performing all styles of music from Caribbean and Latin to Classical and Rock. The Festival Steel Drum Guest Artist in a performance demo clinic and evening concert will be world-renowned steel drum artist, Jeff Narell. Also appearing will be Steel Drum Artist, Festival Tuner, and Massed Band Leader, Shelly Irvine, as well as Jazz Trumpeter, Mike Steinel, and Vibraphonist, Ed Smith. Performers receive performance time, comments, recordings, and concert tickets.

    Performances will be outdoors in the breezeway on the east side of campus adjacent to Fannin Performance Hall
    I demand that the DCCCD Board appoint independent counsel to make a formal inquiry into the advising, spending and administration for the Richland Music Department that is clearly in crisis!

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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Subscribe



    Fall Lunch Concert Series

    Back to Events

    Thursday, November 14, 2019
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
    (CT)

    Richland College - Main Campus
    12800 Abrams Road
    Dallas TX 75243

    Derrick Logozzo
    972-238-6254

    On the Concert Stage in the Richland Cafeteria (El Paso Hall). All performances are free and open to the public. Concert Schedule is tentative and subject to change.
    Free and Open to the public.
    Richland Jazz Combos

    MUSI-1303-81002 (1227567)
    Fundamentals of Music Class Started
    F170
    LEC

    T R

    11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

    Logan, Melissa / Vita RLC
    3
    Aug 26, 2019
    Dec 12, 2019
    (16 weeks)
    Class Started
    eCampus Course Description
    Class Syllabus
    Textbook Info
    Comments:
    NOTE: Pre-College Music Theory course.

    A student in the Combo that played today in the Richland cafeteria, a school-sponsored and advertised event, that required the attendance and participation of all Jazz Combo Class members was barred from playing in the concert by Melissa Logan. Melissa Logan is the totally incompetent advisor that has been putting music majors in her Fundamentals of Music Theory class that is not a college level class, not on any degree plan, will not transfer, but does count put students closer to having to pay out of state tuition and exhausting their financial aid eligibility. That student was not allowed to set-up or sound check and missed playing half of the performance because Logan would not allow them to leave her class to be where they were required to be. Playing performances is required of a music major.

    Logan had half of her choirs removed from the schedule this fall. The remaining choirs need to be moved to Eastfield and the program at Richland carefully evaluated and restructured. For now all the other professors on campus should bar her choir students from performing during their class time or going to contest and field trips with her. Turnabout is fair play. Logan is totally out of line and should be removed from her position.

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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    0000397
    HIST-1301 3
    0000397 MATH-1332 3
    0000397
    MUEN-1122 Jazz Big Band 1
    0000397 MUEN-1137 Wind Symphony 1
    0000397 MUEN-1123 Jazz Combo 1
    0000397 MUSI-9176 recital 1
    0000397
    MUSI-1311 Music Theory 1 3
    0000397 MUSI-1116 Ear Training 1 1
    0000397 MUSI-1181 Piano Class 1
    0000397
    MUAP-2253
    Tuba
    2
    0000397 MUAP-2215
    Electric Bass
    2

    19 hours in 11 classes. A Freshman should be taking only 1 ensemble and 1 lesson. I am in an ensemble with this student. We have rarely seen them in class this semester. This student skipped our first performance entirely and then promised to come back to class but never materialized. They just flounced up on stage for our final 3 concerts this week after not having rehearsed with us for weeks. I do not blame the student. Derrick Logozzo, the Music Department Head is still putting students into numerous classes that are far beyond what is on the degree plan. This student should be in 1 ensemble and 1 private lesson for only 4 semesters as that is all that will transfer, but as usual the students are being used to fill chairs.

    No one could manage all these classes and lessons. How can they practice 3-4 hours a day on each of the 2 instruments, practice piano for a minimum of an hour a day and prepare all the music for 3 very demanding ensembles, handle the challenging Music Theory work plus handle core classes and likely employment as well? Yet another student being set up to fail by the Music Advisor from Purgatory. Any hours that are not on the degree plan at a 4 year university in Texas will be hours that will land a student in out of state tuition (30 over the written degree plan) and may cause them to exhaust their eligibility for financial aid. This horrific advising must be stopped by removing the errant advisors that are still doing this to trusting, innocent students.

    Being a member of these groups where the attendance is abysmal is miserable. It is totally disrespectful to the professor and other students to skip class. This college is supposed to serve transfer capable students and prepare them to successfully finish a degree at a 4 year university as well as provide music opportunities to community members. No one is being served at Richland at this juncture. No real school tolerates students missing class without very good cause. Richland's Music Department is a total disaster. What was once the feeder school to UNT is now nothing but a disorganized mess. This department should never have been accredited and will not be able to keep its accreditation with this ongoing advising fiasco, students frequently cutting class and students who don't attend and do the work being passed to keep the chairs full. In music classes attendance is everything period. The DCCCD board needs to step in and appoint special counsel to get to the bottom of this and get this department leadership that will follow degree plans and do the right things for the students and taxpayers.

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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    ....Number of Ensembles

    · Concern: Eastfield enrolls students in 1 MUAP, 1 MUEN, and recital as MUAP co-requisites and that should be standard practice
    Response: This has also been the practice at Richland College....

    Thu 7/11/2019 2:49 PM

    Mrs. Dobrott,

    Richland College administration has reviewed your concerns with its music program and prepared the attached responses. Please send any additional comments or concerns you may have to me.

    Respectfully,

    Donna Walker
    Associate Vice President of Enrollment Management
    Richland College

    I will let the records themselves speak to that! I have spoken to Freshman music students. They are not aware of the out of state tuition looming before them or the degree plan hours at Richland and the 4 year universities they may wish to transfer to. The advisors are not informing these students that it is vital to follow the Guided Pathway at Richland and take only the hours on it as it transfers as a 60 hour block. They are not being warned about out of state tuition and the reality that they may be taking many extra hours after they transfer. They are not made aware of the risk of exhausting financial aid. Richland students and their paying parents are still being kept in the dark.

    Derrick Logozzo continues to put students way beyond the 1 ensemble (MUEN) and 1 private lesson (MUAP) for only 4 semesters that they should be taking. Logozzo is still putting students in MUSI-1303 Fundamentals of Music Theory which is not on any degree plan, is not a college level class, but will put students closer to out of state tuition and keeps them trapped at Richland for another full year as they will still have two years of Music Theory to take. Note that students are taking very few core classes, so many have dozens of hours that will not transfer and aren't close to getting their 60 hour Associate's Degree. The advising is absolutely criminal!

    One student who plans to graduate in May 2020 with 150 credit hours mind you was told by Derrick Logozzo not to worry about out of state tuition. He will begin his Junior year paying out of state tuition and by his senior year will no longer be eligible for any financial aid at a 4 year Texas University.

    Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan are not running the program honestly and looking out for the students. They are filling chairs and wasting students hours eligible for financial aid and in state tuition. This program is predatory. Dr. Kay Eggleston assured me that Diane Hilbert, the Executive Dean of Fine and Performing Arts, was looking at the records that I have previously posted and was going to "make recommendations." What in the hell did Hilbert recommend?????

    Thirty Credit Hour Limit Rule

    Beginning the fall 2006 semester, first time freshmen, and entering freshmen thereafter, will be under the 30 Plus Hour Rule. The rule states that students who attempt more than 30 credit hours over their degree plan at Texas State funded institutions of higher education and have not yet earned a baccalaureate degree will be charged out-of-state tuition. Attempted hours include hours a student is registered for through the census class day.
    DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    CORE CREDIT HOURS FOR THIS AA DEGREE
    [QUOTE]
    32
    REQUIRED MUSIC ENSEMBLE FIELD OF STUDY COURSES


    Select FOUR semester hours from the following:
    MUEN 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1151, 1152, 1153, 2123, 2141
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)
    4
    APPLIED STUDY


    I. Select EIGHT (8) semester hours in the major applied area of study of the following:
    MUAP 1101, 1105, 1109, 1113, 1115, 1117, 1121, 1125, 1129, 1133, 1137, 1141, 1145, 1149, 1153, 1157, 1158, 1161, 1165, 1169, 1177, 1181, 2201, 2205, 2209, 2213, 2215, 2217, 2221, 2225, 2229, 2233, 2237, 2241, 2245, 2249, 2253, 2257, 2258, 2261, 2265, 2269, 2277, 2281
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)

    II. Applied/class piano
    MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182; MUAP 1169, 2269, 2369
    8
    THEORY/AURAL SKILLS


    Select EACH of the following:
    MUSI 1116, 1117, 1311, 1312, 2116, 2117, 2311, 2312
    16
    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR THIS AA DEGREE 60

    Note: State universities are required to accept only 60 hours in transfer; therefore, it is strongly suggested that students check with their receiving university regarding the acceptance of any credit hours over the 60-credi-hour maximum.
    0000158
    MUSI-1311
    Music Theory 1
    3
    0000158 MUSI-1116 Ear Training 1
    1
    0000158
    MUAP-2269 Clarinet 2
    0000158 MUAP-2237 Trumpet 2
    0000158
    MUEN-1137 Wind Symphony 1
    0000158 MUEN-1122 Jazz Big Band 1
    0000158 MUSI-9176 Recital 1
    0000158
    MUEN-1152 Chamber 1
    0000158
    MUAP-2229 Piano 2



    0000159 MUSI-9176 Recital 1
    0000159
    MUEN-1137 Wind Symphony 1
    0000159 MUEN-1122 Jazz Big Band 1
    0000159
    MUAP-1169 Piano 1
    0000159 MUAP-2237 Trumpet 2
    0000159
    MUSI-1116 Ear Training 1 1
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    MUAP-1157 Percussion 1



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    Baritone
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    MUEN-1122 Jazz Big Band 1
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    MUAP-2237 Trumpet 2
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  9. #158
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    10 musicians earn a new home at the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Now, they work to keep it
    .....Nickson competed against 138 percussionists from around the world. Because of such low odds, musicians can go years without winning an orchestral position. This life can become expensive and exhausting. As detailed in the famous 2004 New York Times article "The Juilliard Effect: Ten Years Later," bassoonist Chad Alexander once sold his instrument for $5,300 to pay credit card bills. "It got to the point where you're just tired of being poor," he told The Times.

    Orchestral hopefuls often need to hold day jobs to get by. Many teach and some work outside of classical music. When a position in an orchestra opens up, they can try their luck again, but of course, there’s no guarantee of success.
    What does it take to win one of these coveted orchestral jobs, then? First, intense preparation. Sandwick, who joined the clarinet section after holding a position in the San Francisco Ballet Orchestra, follows an eight-week schedule leading up to each audition. At some points, he structures his day to the hour, allotting time for practice, physical exercise, studying scores, meals and sleep.
    “You give up so much,” Sandwick says. “Your personal relationships can suffer sometimes.”.....


    That DMN exceprt was a snippet of a must read for every potential music major. "The Julliard Effect" speaks of those that were the musical stars and geniuses before they even stepped on a college campus. Richland is not advising these students about the realities of performing or teaching music.

    The filling of chairs with students to make numbers has got to stop. Music students' class attendance is simply abysmal. Most students are in excess hours of ensembles and private lessons that won't transfer, but will put them in out of state tuition and possibly exhaust their financial aid. Students are in so many classes that they should not be placed in that they are overwhelmed and are not able to get in even a fraction of the practice time that they need to have to go forward in music.

  10. #159
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Please note how large and diverse the choirs were under Dr. Crawford, who welcomed all ages and backgrounds. There were many older community members and non-music majors. Dr. Crawford had 100 singers. Logan has destroyed this once well respected program. There are now only 51 singers in her remaining 2 of what was 5 choirs. Logan has run off all of the older singers, community members and the numerous students pursuing other majors that would come in to sing as they had in their successful high school programs save 1 dear older lady who came in under Dr. Crawford.

    Now, the choir is filled with supposed music majors. Logan makes pretty much everyone a vocal major with no thought to whether they have the skills, background and career aspirations that make that a viable choice of major. With out of state tuition and exhaustion of financial aid a painful reality, every credit hour attempted should be on a carefully chosen degree plan. Logan is just filling her chairs with trusting young adults who may be seriously harmed by her absolutely criminal advising. There are a whopping 36 students out of the 51 singers in 2 credit hour (1 hour MUAP) voice lessons. Another 18 are taking 1 credit hour (half an hour MUAP) voice lessons. 36 students are in the Voice Masterclass which is not transferable and should have been a part of their voice studios and not another class to put them closer to out of state tuition.

    Richland still has only 11 practice rooms for the 500 enrollments including these 51 choir students and those rooms are monopolized by adjuncts. How are these students and all their fellow instrumental students able to get in the many hours of practice necessary with virtually no rooms available? All students must also achieve piano proficiency to graduate with a four year music degree. NASM (National Association of Schoold of Music) recommends 1 practice room for every 4 students for accredited schools. These music students cannot practice.

    The music program is not a legitimate program in its current state. The Music Department advising is putting piles of students in that are not prepared to pursue a degree in as music majors with the facilities woefully inadequate to support the students being put in the program. The program needs to be completely restructured so that students that are qualified will be brought in as majors and prepared to transfer in two years with what is actually on degree plans and so that community members and those wanting continuing professional development can come in and get classes they need.

    The out of state tuition nightmare has not been addressed. The advising designed to fill chairs is a disaster. Richland once was the feeder school to UNT and very highly regarded. UNT didn't do theory placement tests on Dr. Wallace's students. Anyone who made it through Dr. Wallace's rigorous classes could breeze through graduate theory classes as I know personally. Richland will not be attracting top students with this advising. And, needless to say when armies of unqualified students are brought in and totally overloaded the attendance is abysmal. The ensembles and other music classes have shockingly low attendance and students casually stroll in late. So, it is not a serious program that can turn out students capable of making it at a real music school. Missing class and walking in late was never tolerated in the past in this program and isn't tolerated at 4 year universities in their music programs.

    Richland needs to be thoroughly evaluated by DCCCD and this program needs to be put back on track. The program isn't serving anyone is this state.
    Attachment 24092Attachment 24093Attachment 24094Attachment 24286Attachment 24095
    Last edited by Soapboxmom; 11-24-2019 at 12:26 PM.

  11. #160
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Thu 7/11/2019 2:49 PM

    Donna Walker
    Associate Vice President of Enrollment Management
    Richland College

    • Concern: Voice masterclass should be part of the private lesson and not a separate course and the course description has been changed to use it for masterclass
      • Response: Voice masterclass will no longer be a requirement of voice MUAP.

    President Kay Eggleston was copied on that as well. For this fall the class was offered and Melissa Logan, the advisor from hell, put 36 students into the class that doesn't exist, is not on any degree plan for a voice major or voice concentration student, won't transfer and puts students closer to out of state tuition. The registration page for fall read as follows:

    Contact Director Melissa Logan, 972.238.6281, melissalogan@dcccd.edu for placement.
    The class is integrated into the voice studio at every other college on the dang planet. Students are required to attend, but it is not a separate credit class as it is at Richland, but included as part of the lesson. The class should not be on the schedule as for spring 2020 it should be included in the MUAP (voice lesson) that students register for. Once again, Richland has lied to the taxpayers, paying parents and students. Richland continues to ignore degree plans and out of state tuition concerns and has again placed the masterclass on the schedule and listing it as required:

    MUSI 1183 Voice Class I 1 Credit Hours (3 classes)
    Course Description for MUSI 1183

    MUSI 1183 (1 Credit Hours)
    Voice Class I
    This is a Texas Common Course Number.

    Course Description: This course is for non-voice majors. It presents the principles of breathing, voice production, tone control, enunciation, and phrasing in two group lessons a week. This course may be repeated for credit. (2 Lab.)

    Coordinating Board Academic Approval Number 5009085126
    View Catalog Entry View Catalog Entry

    Course-Num-Sect(Reg#)
    Title
    Class Meeting
    Information
    Faculty Information Loc
    Credits
    Start / End Dates
    Open Seats / Capacity
    Class
    Features
    Links
    Richland College [RLC] - MUSI 1183 Sections
    MUSI-1183-83004 Class Syllabus for MUSI-1183-83004 (1262290)
    Voice Class I Add Class
    F289

    LAB

    T R
    10:00 AM - 10:55 AM
    Talley-Crowder, Shannon / Vita View the Vita for Talley-Crowder, Shannon RLC
    1
    Jan 21, 2020
    May 14, 2020
    (16 weeks)
    Open Seats: 20
    Capacity: 20
    eCampus Course Description View Course Description for MUSI 1183
    Find Class Availability Find Class Availability for MUSI-1183-83004
    Class Syllabus (PDF) Class Syllabus for MUSI-1183-83004
    Textbook Info Textbook Info for MUSI-1183-83004
    MUSI-1183-83002 Class Syllabus for MUSI-1183-83002 (1244987)
    Voice Class:voice Master Class Add Class
    F176
    LAB

    R
    12:30 PM - 01:50 PM
    Griffin-Dyer, Beverly / Vita View the Vita for Griffin-Dyer, Beverly RLC
    1
    Jan 21, 2020
    May 14, 2020
    (16 weeks)
    Open Seats: 30
    Capacity: 30
    eCampus Course Description View Course Description for MUSI 1183
    Find Class Availability Find Class Availability for MUSI-1183-83002
    Class Syllabus (PDF) Class Syllabus for MUSI-1183-83002
    Textbook Info Textbook Info for MUSI-1183-83002
    Comments:

    Note: Required for voice majors and students enrolled in MUAP 1181 or MUAP 2281. Contact Director, Melissa Logan, 972.238.6284 melissalogan@dcccd.edu Email Instructor for placement.
    MUSI-1183-83003 Class Syllabus for MUSI-1183-83003 (1244988)
    Voice Class: Voice Master Clas Add Class
    F289

    LAB

    R
    12:30 PM - 01:50 PM
    Arduino, Natalie / Vita View the Vita for Arduino, Natalie RLC
    1
    Jan 21, 2020
    May 14, 2020
    (16 weeks)
    Open Seats: 30
    Capacity: 30
    eCampus Course Description View Course Description for MUSI 1183
    Find Class Availability Find Class Availability for MUSI-1183-83003
    Class Syllabus (PDF) Class Syllabus for MUSI-1183-83003
    Textbook Info Textbook Info for MUSI-1183-83003
    Comments:

    Note: Required for voice majors and students enrolled in MUAP 1181 or MUAP 2281. Contact Director, Melissa Logan, 972.238.6284 melissalogan@dcccd.edu Email Instructor for placement.

    F289
    Capacity:10
    UTA Voice Handbook rev 8-13.pdf

    The room being used is not to hold more than ten people. The Fire Marshall has already addressed this and here we go again. Total incompetence!

    Richland's music advisors and the administration over them are totally dishonest and predatory. This is inexcusable. When is Richland going to offer a legitimate music program that mirrors the first two years at a real music school? The DCCCD board needs to step in and clean up this mess of a music department. If the board doesn't take immediate corrective action then the taxpayers need to vote in a new board that will provide proper oversight!

  12. #161
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Dallas, Texas Bond Election Under Intense Scrutiny https://thenewamerican.com/usnews/politics/item/32921-dallas-texas-bond-election-under-intense-scrutiny DCCCD Board member Dorothy Zimmerman is asking the tough questions. Time to for Zimmerman to ask the tough questions about horrifically bad advising, out of state tuition and the music building is extremely poor repair at Richland College. Our tax dollars at waste!

  13. #162
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Billion-Dollar Debt on Dallas County Ballot - Texas Scorecard

    ....Compton also lodged a complaint about the lack of transparency within the board: Timely and complete information is critical to the ability to form substantive questions. It is hard [to] read information given to you at the last minute and listen while someone is speaking. There is no doubt in my mind that some of these actions are intentional.”
    “Transparency and abuse of the sunshine laws are a serious problem for me,” Compton added in her statement for the record. “The public has a right to know. They do pay the bills.”


    In just the past year, the average Dallas County homeowner’s college district tax bill went up by 10 percent, from $215 to $237. From 2013 to 2018, the average homeowner’s district tax bill increased by over 70 percent. Enrollment during the same five-year period increased a fraction of that amount—if at all.
    According to the district’s online bond “quick facts,” enrollment grew 13 percent from 2013 to 2018, from 73,206 to 82,800 students. But the district’s most recent financial statements show the number of students enrolled in credit classes declined by 4 percent from 2013 to 2017, to 69,089 students. Including noncredit students, district data shows enrollment down to 79,219 during the same period—an 8 percent decline.

    Texas Scorecard reported in 2016 on the district’s questionable track record. The college’s board has racked up debt, raised property tax bills repeatedly, and doubled the tuition cost for students, all during a period of declining student enrollment.
    Taxpayers are still paying off DCCCD’s last debt package, approved in 2004 for $450 million. The district currently owes $274 million in bond debt principal and interest, all of which must be repaid with property taxes.
    .......
    Clearly, DCCCD is not running a tight ship. The lack of transparency and outright dishonesty about the horrific advising makes that abundantly clear. I hope the lawsuit forces a revote on that bond. I will definitely vote no this time. Enrollment is decreasing as it should if people are advised honestly and kept strictly on a degree or certificate program that will actually lead to gainful employment. Richland's Fannin Hall is in horrible disrepair and the equipment such as the pianos is representative of that sad fact. The taxpayers have been kept in the dark about so much!

  14. #163
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Dallas County College Gouging Students and Taxpayers - Texas Scorecard

    Over the last ten years, students were hit with record tuition hikes. In-district and out-of-district Texans saw a 73% and 94% hike, respectively. Out of state students saw their rates jump 33%, with a 60% increase for international students.

    Despite enrollment steadily declining every year since 2010, DCCCD officials continued to expand their massive budget. Most taxpayers are unaware that the separately governed entity spends more money than what Dallas County itself collects in property taxes.

    A cursory review of the college’s audited financial report reveals two glaring problems. The first is an excessive number of academic facilities.

    In anticipation of increased enrollment that never fully materialized, elected officials aggressively added 22 new academic buildings after 2008. But since 2010, enrollment has continued to decline every year.

    The second problem is one emblematic of government institutions—an ever-increasing budget largely unrelated to the educational services needed, driven in part by a massive increase in non-instructional positions.

    While instructional spending itself rose twice as fast as student enrollment since 2006 (36% vs 19%), spending for non-instructional staff grew three times faster than enrollment (62%). In fact, after initially reducing administrative staff after enrollment began to decline, those staffing reductions were eventually reversed.

    Today, the total number of non-teaching staff nearly exceeds the previous high in 2009, just before student enrollment peaked.
    Critics are left wondering whether DCCCD’s board believes its mission is that of an employment or educational institution.

    With Bill Metzer as the only dissenting vote, the board has voted to raise property tax rates 52% since 2006. The board’s insistence on raising taxes on a larger tax base has resulted in them collecting twice as much tax revenue today as compared to 2006.

    Remember, that’s on top of doubling tuition rates for Texas students.
    District officials will point to “stagnant funding” from the state, which only rose eight percent over the same period. But the government’s own financial statements disprove this false claim.

    Total revenue collected by DCCCD including federal and state subsidies, tuition, and tax revenue has increased nearly three times as fast as student enrollment (57% versus 19%). The discrepancy becomes all the more dramatic after enrollment began to fall in 2010, as the district’s budget continued to grow almost every single year.

    Dallas County voters who care about taxpaying families, struggling businesses, and low-income students would be wise to vote in May’s election. DCCCD’s trustees serve six-year terms, so a missed opportunity in 2016 will all but guarantee more of the same—skyrocketing spending, property taxes, and tuition.
    DCCCD needs to correct the advising and quit putting people in degree programs they would not be able to get into in the real colleges out there. DCCCD needs repair and maintain the facilities it has before building more new expensive ones in downtown. DCCCD needs to combine programs to make them more economical for taxpayers and actually workable for the students.

    Richland has an incredible strings program, jazz program and bands. Richland has a serious lack of practice rooms and ensemble rooms to run the program. Eastfield has a beautiful choir room and could take all the vocalists and serve them well while all instrumentalist are sent to Richland. Cedar Valley already has the full gamut of recording technology classes and all students should be sent there for that training and not strung along with a the very few classes at Richland in that field. Steel drums are only offered at Richland, but again there is no storage space and adequate facilities to have that program without some serious consolidation and sensible planning. DCCCD is in chaos! It is time for some real change and district wide planning!

  15. #164
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/Publ...fn=minutes.pdf

    The 2 dissenting votes on the bond that is tied up in litigation is a must read. Please see the final pages of the approved minutes linked above.

  16. #165
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    ....Number of Ensembles

    · Concern: Eastfield enrolls students in 1 MUAP, 1 MUEN, and recital as MUAP co-requisites and that should be standard practice

    VP Donna Walker's Response: This has also been the practice at Richland College....


    Thu 7/11/2019 2:49 PM

    Mrs. Dobrott,

    Richland College administration has reviewed your concerns with its music program and prepared the attached responses. Please send any additional comments or concerns you may have to me.

    Respectfully,

    Donna Walker
    Associate Vice President of Enrollment Management
    Richland College
    The records show that the Richland Administration is totally misrepresenting what the music advisors have been doing and continue to do. Students are not informed that they must follow degree plans from Richland and the 4 year universities they may wish to transfer to. The music advisors are not informing these students that it is vital to follow the Guided Pathway at Richland and take only the hours on it as it transfers as a 60 hour block. They are not being warned about out of state tuition and the reality that they may be taking many extra hours after they transfer. They are not made aware of the risk of exhausting financial aid. Richland students and their paying parents are still being kept in the dark.

    Derrick Logozzo continues to put students way beyond the 1 ensemble (MUEN) and 1 private lesson (MUAP) for only 4 semesters that they should be taking. Logozzo is still putting students in MUSI-1303 Fundamentals of Music Theory which is not on any degree plan, is not a college level class, but will put students closer to out of state tuition and keeps them trapped at Richland for another full year as they will still have two years of Music Theory to take. Note that students are taking very few core classes, so many have dozens of hours that will not transfer and aren't close to getting their 60 hour Associate's Degree. The advising is absolutely criminal!

    One student who plans to graduate in May 2020 with 150 credit hours mind you was told by Derrick Logozzo not to worry about out of state tuition. He will begin his Junior year paying out of state tuition and by his senior year will no longer be eligible for any financial aid at a 4 year Texas University.

    Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan are not running the program honestly and looking out for the students. They are filling chairs and wasting students hours eligible for financial aid and in state tuition. This program is predatory. Dr. Kay Eggleston assured me that Diane Hilbert, the Executive Dean of Fine and Performing Arts, was looking at the records that I have previously posted and was going to "make recommendations." What in the Sam Hell did Hilbert recommend?????


    Thirty Credit Hour Limit Rule

    Beginning the fall 2006 semester, first time freshmen, and entering freshmen thereafter, will be under the 30 Plus Hour Rule. The rule states that students who attempt more than 30 credit hours over their degree plan at Texas State funded institutions of higher education and have not yet earned a baccalaureate degree will be charged out-of-state tuition. Attempted hours include hours a student is registered for through the census class day.


    DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    CORE CREDIT HOURS FOR THIS AA DEGREE





    32

    REQUIRED MUSIC ENSEMBLE FIELD OF STUDY COURSES


    Select FOUR semester hours from the following:
    MUEN 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1151, 1152, 1153, 2123, 2141
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)
    4
    APPLIED STUDY


    I. Select EIGHT (8) semester hours in the major applied area of study of the following:
    MUAP 1101, 1105, 1109, 1113, 1115, 1117, 1121, 1125, 1129, 1133, 1137, 1141, 1145, 1149, 1153, 1157, 1158, 1161, 1165, 1169, 1177, 1181, 2201, 2205, 2209, 2213, 2215, 2217, 2221, 2225, 2229, 2233, 2237, 2241, 2245, 2249, 2253, 2257, 2258, 2261, 2265, 2269, 2277, 2281
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)

    II. Applied/class piano
    MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182; MUAP 1169, 2269, 2369
    8
    THEORY/AURAL SKILLS


    Select EACH of the following:
    MUSI 1116, 1117, 1311, 1312, 2116, 2117, 2311, 2312
    16
    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR THIS AA DEGREE 60


    Note: State universities are required to accept only 60 hours in transfer; therefore, it is strongly suggested that students check with their receiving university regarding the acceptance of any credit hours over the 60-credi-hour maximum.

    Steel Band Students
    Instructor Derrick Logozzo Music Department Chair and Music Advisor
    20 Enrolled



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  17. #166
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    26 Texas Colleges and Universities Selected to Participate in Dana Center-led Collaboration | UT Dana Center

    October 15, 2019|By Dana Center Communications
    Transfer Partnership Strategy aims to boost student success by addressing barriers in student transfer policies and practice.
    The Texas Transfer Alliance (TTA) has announced the selection of 26 Texas higher education institutions to participate in a one-year collaboration to improve student success in college. Every year, thousands of Texas students transfer between colleges and universities. Due to differences in policies and curricula among institutions, many students face major challenges in transferring course credits, leading to lost time and increased financial burdens that often impact their chances of successfully completing a degree. The Texas Transfer Alliance is a collaboration between the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin, the Texas Association of Community Colleges (TACC), the Texas A&M University System, the Texas State University System, the University of North Texas System, and the University of Texas System.
    Building on prior TTA work, the Dana Center leads this one-year effort, known as the Transfer Partnership Strategy (TPS), which is supported by a recent grant from the Trellis Foundation. Since Fall 2018, TTA has collaborated with three national transfer partners—the Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program, HCM Strategists, and Sova—to develop a long-term strategy for improving successful student transfer in Texas, Minnesota, and Virginia.
    Research indicates that successful student transfer relies on a broad range of local and regional factors including:

    • Alignment of degree requirements policies between colleges and universities to reduce lost credits
    • Reduction of time-to degree-completion
    • Introduction of student supports to promote the completion of entry-level mathematics and English courses within the first year
    • Student advising designed to provide four-year degree completion plans even for students attending two-year institutions

    “Changing the transfer landscape to improve student success requires dedicated collaboration between institutions,” said Martha Ellis, the Dana Center’s director of higher education strategy, policy, and services. “Seventy-five percent of Texans who earned a baccalaureate degree took courses at a community college as part of that degree. It is imperative that we work together to make sure students do not lose money, credits, and time when they move from institution to institution to complete their degrees. We anticipate very positive and visible impacts for Texas students, especially those from underrepresented racial and income groups.”
    The 26 Texas institutions selected for the Alliance’s TPS work represent two- and four-year institutions across the state....
    The institutions joining the Transfer Partnership Strategy are:
    ....
    Dallas County Community College District
    ...
    https://facultyresourcenetwork.org/p...emic-advising/
    Legal Implications of Academic Advising


    Challenge as Opportunity: The Academy in the Best and Worst of Times


    A National Symposium

    November 20-21, 2009

    Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College, and Spelman College

    Atlanta, Georgia

    Audrey Wolfson Latourette, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

    Colleges and universities employ a variety of means to afford academic advising to their students, including the use of faculty serving as preceptors and/or a Director and advising staff emanating from a Center of Academic Advising, among others. Whether the institution of higher education utilizes the Banner CAPP Degree Evaluation system, old school methods of advising documents or curriculum sheets, e-mail correspondence, or on-site interviews, the goal essentially remains the same: to provide a structure wherein students can satisfy all academic requisites, maintain the necessary cumulative average, fulfill athletic and scholarship requirements, and graduate in a timely fashion. Irrespective of what approach is adopted, many in the academy evince concern regarding the legal implications of erroneous guidance given a student which hampers their ability to comply with the foregoing objectives. Indeed, students do employ a variety of legal theories, including estoppel,i breach of contract, and negligence, to enforce statements issued by academic advisors or other representatives of the university......


    Courts evince an increased willingness to afford students relief where the students were able to demonstrate that they had relied on numerous assurances issued by responsible parties at the university, or where the college’s printed materials were contradictory in nature, or where the university representatives engaged in intentional misrepresentation upon which students relied to their detriment. In Blank v. Board of Higher Education of the City of New York,xx for example, a student in the three plus one program (three years of undergraduate studies coupled with one year of law school would satisfy the requisites for an undergraduate degree) at Brooklyn College was advised by the Office of Counseling, the head of the psychology program, and two psychology professors who supervised independent studies courses that the requisites for the degree could be satisfied with two independent studies taken off campus. All subsequently denied making such promises. Further, the defendants insisted that the student had acted without benefit of the dean’s permission, and that requirements mandating independent studies courses be taken in residence should be strictly enforced.xxi The student, after completing the off campus courses, had received an invitation to attend graduation, had attended with his family, and then failed to see his name in the graduation bulletin, and, in fact, was not awarded the degree at the ceremony. In this case the court held the college was estopped from denying the proffered statements, from asserting the courses had to be taken in another manner, and from refusing to tender the degree.xxii The several assurances tendered by the dean’s agents performing within the scope of their apparent authority, coupled with bulletins that contradicted each other, or were silent on the topic of whether independent studies had to be taken on campus, were the primary factors underlying the decision. In a somewhat similar fashion, the transfer student in Healy v. Schenectady County Community Collegexxiii had consulted with numerous college officials as to the proper course of study; yet the college claimed he had insufficient credits in his major to graduate. The student claimed he had conferred with the Dean, Director of Admissions, Acting President, Guidance Counselor and Chairman of the Mathematics Department of the college. The court noted that an implied contract exists between a student and a private university, and that “there is no reason why this principle should not apply to a public university or community college.”xxiv Thus, the court held an implied contract existed at the public university that if the student complied with the terms stated by the representatives, he would receive his degree; therefore, the college was estopped from denying the acts of its agents, and the court directed the college to grant the student a degree. And finally, in Byrd v. Dr. Horace Lamar (Alabama State University)xxvi where a college intentionally misrepresented the existence and viability of a major the student wished to pursue, both in college catalogs and in representations by the Dean and the Vice President of Academic Affairs, the court ruled the representatives who induced reasonable reliance on the part of the student were not immune from civil liability. In this case, the officials at Alabama State repeatedly assured a student that he would be able to pursue a music media major, as had been represented in the university catalog. Instead, the courses were not offered, or when offered were taught by untrained faculty,xxvii and the equipment necessary to teach such a specialized curriculum was never forthcoming. The court held that while the college as a state institution is afforded immunity pursuant to the state constitution, the state agent who willfully, maliciously, fraudulently or in bad faith advises a student is not provided such protection.xxviii



    Case law suggests as well, however, that where repeated assurances by multiple authorities are offered to a student regarding course selection requirements for graduation, or where college catalogs or brochures contain contradictory information respecting such requirements, and a student complies in good faith with such advice, the institution may be bound by those contractual assurances if tendered by its publications and/or its agents acting with apparent authority. In an era of increased competition for a client base among institutions of higher education, and in an era of greater expectations from a consumer-oriented student population, it behooves the college or university to clearly set forth the student’s responsibility in all institutional publications, eliminate ambiguities or inconsistencies regarding requirements in said publications, and formally train its advising staff and faculty in the standards and record-keeping attendant to good quality academic advising. Such measures will reflect the institution’s bona fide efforts to address the best interests of its students while concomitantly serving to provide a defense to allegations of erroneous advising.


    The Richland administration and DCCCD board have been informed in writing numerous times and the music advisors as well publicly in a recital of more than 100 students and faculty from 4 area universities that students needed to follow the degree plans and not go over hours due to the law concerning out of state tuition. Read the thread here from start to finish and all of this is thoroughly documented. A year later, the Richland College music advisors are knowingly and deliberately continuing to advise students to take dozens of hours over degree plans and placing them in danger of out of state tuition.

    VP Donna Walker stated that "This has also been the practice at Richland College." That practice being to follow the degree plans / Guided Pathways and put music students in 1 ensemble and 1 private lesson each semester for four semesters is what was said to have been done and to be done going forward. The student records show that this is a bold-faced lie. Students are being placed in piles of credit hours that will not transfer, are not on any degree plan, will place them in danger of being charged out of state tuition and keep them in college for extra semesters. This malicious and willful refusal to advise students properly and honestly only serves to fill chairs in the music department to the great detriment of said students. DCCCD is in chaos and the board is not providing proper oversight.

  18. #167
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    https://best-music-colleges.com/richland-college

    Music Ranking 2018: Richland College

    Ranked1,439×


    in the USA
    Richland College is a medium-sized public college offering a number of disciplines along with the music major and located in Dallas, Texas. The school was opened in 1972 and is currently offering associate's degrees in General Music.

  19. #168
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    6 Reasons You May Not Graduate on Time (and What to Do About It) - The New York Times

    ...
    Transferring: You’ll Lose, Usually

    How can this be: Most students need more than four years to graduate yet end up taking, and paying for, many more credits than they need. Colleges and universities usually require 120 credits for a bachelor’s degree but students graduate with about 135, on average, according to data compiled by Complete College America, a nonprofit research and advocacy group.
    Some states’ figures are even higher. Students at regional state colleges in New Mexico graduate with an average of 155 credits.
    One reason is the difficulty of transferring credits from another university or a community college. A third of students transfer at one point in their college careers. Nearly 40 percent of them get no credit for any of the courses they have completed and lose 27 credits on average — or about a year of school, according to a 2014 federal study.

    Many colleges have developed articulation agreements to honor credits earned from other institutions. But often that isn’t enough. A university may accept the credits, but the department of the student’s major may not — and at most colleges, the decision rests with the department.
    Even within a system, credits may not be accepted.....
    “Sometimes students just look at how many credits will transfer and make their decisions from there,” said Maria Campanella, director of the health sciences office of student services at Stony Brook University of the State University of New York. “What they really need to ask is, ‘How many will apply to my degree?’ ”
    Major Problem: Don’t Veer Off Course

    Picking courses can make students feel like kids in a candy store — there are so many possibilities. The process is overwhelming, with thousands of classes....
    “Many of our students did great in high school, but they come here and don’t realize that you can’t just study the night before for a test,” said Zulmaly Ramirez, an academic advocate for first-year students at the University of South Florida. “They used to spend 80 percent of their academic time in class and 20 percent on homework.” In college, that’s reversed. (One U.S.F. effort: an app called “Cold Turkey” that blocks social media for an hour or two so students can study without disruption.)
    Springfield College in Massachusetts wants students to take more responsibility. It has raised the stakes in an effort to force students to manage their time better; administrators call it the “three strikes rule.” Students on academic probation must meet weekly with a coach, who helps them prioritize their work and connects them with tutoring services. Three missed meetings are grounds for expulsion.....
    Richland Music students are totally screwed. Music advisors Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan purposely put students in dozens of ensembles (MUEN), private lessons (MUAP) and Fundamentals of Music Theory that are not on any degree plan at any college on the planet. So, transferring is a nightmare where out of state tuition and exhaustion of financial aid loom. Many credits can be lost in transfer and many more may be needed above what is on a degree plan. So, transferring is a nightmare where out of state tuition and exhaustion of financial aid loom. The Transfer Center at Richland is the first place students should go and all course decisions should be made there!

    Logan and Logozzo don't explain the 80/20 theory to students. The candy store theory is disastrous for students who trust these malicious advisors and happily take mountains of credit classes for no other purpose than just filling chairs for music classes. Music students don't understand that they need to practice their principal instrument for 4 hours or more a day plus piano for an hour or two to attain real proficiency. They don't understand the huge workload the ensembles, theory classes and core classes demand. Students put in 4 ensembles instead of the 1 they should be in and that are placed in numerous lessons over the 1 they should be in are simply drowning. Those ensembles also rehearse and perform during the day, so when a student is in numerous ensembles they are constantly missing other classes. Richland is setting its students up to fail. The music program is in complete chaos most of the time.

    It is high time to expulse the music advisors and start running the music program like a real music school and follow degree plans to the letter so that Richland students can get their 60 hour Associate's Degree in 2 years and transfer to complete their four year degrees in four years!

  20. #169
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    https://www.usnews.com/news/national-news/articles/2016-11-22/when-credits-dont-count-transfer-students-face-debt-more-classes
    ......Yet the U.S. Department of Education says, on average, a transfer student still loses 13 credits already earned and paid for. That's more than a semester's worth of work, or, for all of those students collectively, the equivalent of 186,000 years of college. About four in 10 have no credits transfer at all, and are forced to begin from scratch, the Education Department's National Center for Education Statistics reports.


    "Making people redo this stuff is ridiculous," DeJager says. "It's just a rip-off. People talk about the student loan bubble, and this is one of the reasons it's happening."....

    Problems persist within states, too, especially for students who transfer from community colleges, according to the research organization Education Northwest. That's in part because even when universities accept community college credits, those credits often don't apply toward what's needed for a degree in a particular major...


    "The problem now is that students don't even find out how much transfer credit they're going to get until after they enroll" in their second or third institutions, says Michael Falk, founder and CEO of National College Transfer Center...



    Whatever happens will have to overcome a transfer system that has proven not only intractable, but so cumbersome that a report by the research arm of the College Board, which administers the SAT college admissions examination, labeled it "an academic gauntlet." The report said students who want to transfer face insufficient information, "nonexistent or indecipherable policies," and "enormous complexity."....




    "I had a woman crying to me on the phone, literally crying, because she thought she was a first-semester senior and they told her she was still a first-semester freshman" because her credits didn't transfer from one school to another, Falk recounts.



    The impact is enormous. Having to repeat courses when they transfer is one reason students now take an average of more than five years to earn a bachelor's degree, according to the National Student Clearinghouse, significantly increasing their cost.



    Students who start at community colleges and plan to ultimately earn bachelor's degrees are less likely to get one than their counterparts who start at four-year universities, not because they are less well prepared or get less financial aid, one study found, but because so many of their credits don't transfer.


    The burden falls most heavily on low-income students, who often start at community colleges to save money with the intention of transferring to four-year universities, the Community College Research Center at Teachers College, Columbia University, reported. (The Hechinger Report, which produced this story, is housed at Teachers College.)


    "It's those students that are at a disadvantage, yet again," Marling says.


    Relying on students to solve the problem, she says, may be unrealistic. Sure, says Marling, it's important to provide more counseling about the process, but "to have them figure it out in advance would be really hard" – especially for low-income students whose parents didn't go to college. "These are not individuals who question authority."


    One former community college student who took part in a focus group Marling ran, she says, "did all the right things. She came up with a degree plan, met with an adviser at her college." Then she moved to a four-year university and sat down with an administrator there, "who said, 'No, these credits won't transfer.'"



    That's similar to the welcome DeJager says she got both times she changed schools. "'We don't really know what they taught you,'" she says she was told. "'Can't you contact the college and get a copy of the curriculum?'" she responded. "And they say, 'No.'....




    DCCCD and Richland College are aware that Melissa Logan and Derrick Logozzo are deliberately filling classes with students that they are putting in credit hours that are not on any degree plan at any university on the planet and won't transfer, but this egregious advising continues over a year later. Out of state tuition and exhaustion of financial aid are devastating consequences these students who are often low-income and would never question authority (Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan) may face. The taxpayers need to clean out the DCCCD board as they clearly are not providing any oversight and the spending is out of control and hurting students, their paying parents and taxpayers. Enough!!!!

  21. #170
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    Re: DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Keyboard Studies
    TThe Department of Music at Texas A&M University-Commerce offers a thorough academic foundation and encourages creativity, developing aesthetic awareness in students at every level. The keyboard department strives to develop the unique interests of all keyboard majors and to expand their horizons. Our undergraduate and graduate students receive personal attention and are provided with the tools to develop, sharpen, and expand their keyboard skills through performing, teaching, composing, and studying of standard literature. Our outstanding faculty is committed to nurturing students on a one-on-one basis.

    Piano students receive weekly private lessons, and participate in weekly studio classes. Our comprehensive curriculum supplements the keyboard studies with diverse music courses including those in literature, history, theory, conducting, jazz studies, as well as accompanying.

    There are numerous performance opportunities for students, whether their emphasis is piano or organ. Our piano students earn valuable experience participating in chamber music ensembles and accompanying in applied studios or in one of our ensembles. Master classes, workshops, and lectures by visiting artists are an added bonus in our students’ learning experience.

    Our Goals
    Our goal is to provide students the guidance and encouragement to advance in their musical careers. In today’s competitive world, it is crucial to provide students with the practical skills and knowledge to succeed. Our faculty is devoted to helping students find the program that better meets their educational and professional needs.

    Scholarships and Assistantships
    There are many sources of scholarships available to students depending on the result of the audition. All applicants need to complete their online applications to the university and audition before May 1 of the academic year to be fully considered for scholarships. Students pursuing a graduate degree may be eligible for a graduate assistantship. The amount of the awards varies according to the student’s talent, and potential contribution to the department. Students accepted into the Honors College receive full tuition and housing.

    Personal Attention
    With approximately 275 students, the music department offers a low 4:1 student-faculty ratio, small classes and frequent one-on-one instruction. Every student works closely with his or her mentor, a faculty member who serves as the student’s artistic and academic advisor.


    For Audition information, please e-mail me or visit the Texas A&M University-Commerce Department of Music website.
    Texas A&M University – Commerce
    Department of Music
    Applied Piano
    Fall 2018
    Dr. Luis Sanchez Music Building 231.....

    University Mission Statement Texas A&M University-Commerce nurtures and educates for success through access to academic, research, and service programs of high quality. Mission Statement The Music Department of Texas A&M University – Commerce promotes excellence in music through the rigorous study of music history, literature, theory, composition, pedagogy, and the preparation of music performance in applied study and ensemble to meet the highest standards of aesthetic expression. Student Learning Outcomes By the completion of the semester, the student should be able to:
    1. Learn and perform accurately at least three pieces from different style periods, a contrapuntal work and an etude.
    2. Perform from memory two of the works studied in the semester in studio class and/or studio recital.
    3. Apply a healthy approach to the instrument in practice and performance.
    4. Play selected scales, arpeggios, chord progressions, exercises, and etudes.
    5. Perform from memorize selected works for juries.

    Drop Date If you need to drop this course without penalty, please refer to the current academic calendar. Be aware that your scholarship and/or degree requirements specify a certain number of applied lesson credits. Dropping this course may ultimately affect your scholarship disbursement and/or graduation date. Student Expectations
    Students are expected to attend all required classes and events. Failure to attend mandatory events will result in the deduction of one letter grade from your semester grade. Only 1 absence will be allowed; after that, each absence will result in the deduction of 10 points from your semester grade. I reserve the right to drop a student from the course after four absences. Repeated lateness (after two) for class will also be penalized by lowering your final grade by 5 points for each tardy. Medical excuses and university-sponsored trips are acceptable reasons for missing class. If you do not bring your music to your lesson, that lesson will count as an absence.
    Students are expected to come prepared to their lesson. Lack of preparation is no excuse for rescheduling lessons. Lessons may only be rescheduled in case of illness, school event, or if I am unavailable. In extreme circumstances, you may consider switching your lesson time with another student. I will distribute a studio directory so that you can contact other students in the event you need to switch a lesson. Understand that you should only use this as a last resource and that you must plan your week appropriately to complete your practice and come prepared to your lesson. By the third week of the semester, all students must have purchased copies of their music. Even though you may use photocopies for lessons, you are required to have your OWN music for the midterm and juries. No borrowed books or library copies will be allowed. It is your responsibility and expectation to build your own music library. The Internet and IMSLP are convenient resources, yet many times, these editions have errors in them or are unreliable. If you are uncertain of what editions to buy, please consult with me during the first week of school. Failure to bring your own music for juries and midterm will deduct 2 letter grades from your final grade. Recording Students are encouraged to record their lessons and their performances in studio class. If you would like to use the CD recording device that is in my office you can either use CDs or an SDHC Flash memory card. If you would like me to provide the blank CDs please bring $5 to cover the cost of CDs for the entire semester. It is your responsibility to remind me to insert a blank CD at the beginning of each lesson. You will also have access to video of lessons and studio classes and other events. Required Practice Students are required to practice daily.Piano performance majors are required to practice a minimum of 4 hours each day at least 6 days a week....
    Repertoire Each student will have specific repertoire assignments for the entire semester. You will also receive a worksheet indicating your technique requirements for the midterm and juries. Sight-reading Each student’s sight-reading level will be assessed during the first week of the semester. I have selected the Keith Snell Piano Repertoire publications, published by Kjos, www.kjos.com. Students will be responsible for purchasing the three books (Baroque & Classical, Romantic & Twentieth-Century, and Etudes) for the assigned level. Midterm Exam A midterm exam is scheduled for October 18-19. A sign up sheet with 10-minute slots will be posted one week prior to the exam. Content of the exam:
    1. Technique requirements as determined on the first week of the semester.
    2. An etude
    3. Sight-reading

    Students who are performing a degree recital this semester will not be expected to play the Etude for their midterm, unless it is part of the recital repertoire. Jury All students are required to complete a jury on December 13, unless they have completed a degree recital, in which case they will only be required to perform the technique assignments for the semester at juries. A sign up sheet will be December 7. Content of the exam:
    1. Technique
    2. 3 contrasting pieces.
    3. Sight-reading.
    4. Video upload of the etude performed at midterm (Due date: December 1)

    Piano Minors will play the technique assigned for the semester and two contrasting pieces. Recital Hearings and Recitals Students scheduled to perform a degree recital will be required to successfully complete a recital hearing 3 weeks prior to the scheduled date of the recital. Poor performance in the recital hearing will result in the rescheduling of the recital for the following semester and a failing grade. In extreme circumstances, a student may be allowed to reschedule the recital for the same semester at a later time. Studio Recital and Convocation All students are expected to perform at least once during the semester. The Fall Studio Recital is scheduled for December 3 at 6 pm in the Recital Hall. Convocation dates available for piano students will be announced later in the semester. Studio Class
    Studio class is scheduled on Mondays and Fridays 4:00 to 5:00 pm in the Recital Hall. Please check your e-mail regularly for updates. All students currently enrolled in my studio are expected to perform in at least 3 studio classes.
    Program Notes You will be responsible for writing program notes for all pieces performed in degree recitals or juries. Program notes will be due on week 5. You will receive a handout with a few samples to help you determine the content, length, and appropriate writing style to complete this assignment. Listening Assignments Students will have listening assignments during the semester that will aid them in the study and preparation of the selected repertoire and further exploration of the piano literature and its place in Western Music. Practice Room Etiquette Students will not be allowed to leave books or personal belongings in the piano practice rooms. You may want to have a locker if you would like to store items in the music building. Food and drinks will not be allowed in the practice rooms either. Only bottled water (no open containers!) can be used in the practice room but they should never be placed on the pianos. Please make sure other music students are treating our instruments appropriately. Piano maintenance: Forms to report problems with the piano can be found on the Piano Bulletin board (By the piano lab). Make sure you complete these forms every time you find an issue with one of the pianos. Try to be as specific and as clear as you can so that Mr. Mike Terrill, the piano technician, can fix the problem when he is on campus. Grading:
    Weekly lesson preparation 40% Midterm 20% Jury Or Recital 30% Program Notes/Assignments 10% A=100-90; B=89-80; C=79-70; D=69-60; F=59-0
    That is typical for a real music school and would apply to all instruments. Richland's music program in no way mirrors the Freshman and Sophomore years at a real music school. We have the best adjunct faculty in the state, but there is no program in place to support them and no standards or requirements as we see in real programs like this. There are no weekly studio classes for any instrumentalists at Richland. Students rarely, if ever, perform solo on their instrument as there is virtually no opportunity to do so. Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan are too busy loading students into numerous ensembles (over the 1 per semester that will transfer) in order to fill chairs. Attendance is abysmal all around as students are totally overwhelmed and some are not music major material and should have never been admitted to or retained in the program. Students know they needn't come to class or lessons as there is no consequence. Richland students are in so much crap (as in numerous ensembles and additional instrument lessons that will not transfer and put students into out of state tuition,) that they can't practice and prepare for a real lesson. Students in numerous ensembles miss their other classes constantly and end up exhausted and burned out. Some end up failing core classes (if they are actually taking any.)

    Many students at Richland do 1 piece per instrument per semester and most put in very little practice time. Of course, with 500 music enrollments and 11 practice rooms that are frequently taken by adjuncts teaching lessons, there is nowhere for students to practice. Even though all music majors must pass piano proficiency test, there are not decent pianos to be found. Most pianos are missing numerous key covers and are honky tonk tuned. Where is Richland's piano repair tech?

    It is a circus atmosphere rather than a serious academic environment in the Richland Music Department. The program is a disaster and though the administration and DCCCD board have been informed in writing numerous times over the last year, nothing has been done. Trusting students are being preyed upon for the purpose of filling chairs and the taxpayers are wasting precious funds for naught!

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