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Thread: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Derrick Logozzo, Music Department Head of DCCCD's Richland College, has great exams for HIS ensembles only during finals week. Who needs practice rooms, pianos in good repair or degree plans followed when Logozzo's students can have blowout pizza parties on the taxpayers' dime! The other music ensemble professors and professors across the campus don't get to take their classes out on the taxpayers dime. The Dallas County taxpayers have no idea how money is being blown in the Richland Music Department.






    We obviously can't trust Derrick Logozzo, Richland College or the DCCCD board to handle money responsibly!

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    DCCCD Chancellor is paid a whopping $412,000.00 annually. A guest artist that performed a Tuesday night concert and Wednesday evening recital fundraiser for Richland's imploding music program got paid a whopping $4,000.00. 11 people including me came for the joke of a fundraiser in the Brazos Gallery.

    But, instead of putting in more practice rooms, buying more pianos, repairing existing pianos, buying needed amps, buying keyboard stands and other absolutely essential equipment, Logozzo is blowing money taking students out so that he can lure them into signing up for dozens of hours that are not on any degree plan and blowing major dollars on guest artists. Since when was wasting students' in state tuition and financial aid eligible hours to fill chairs ethical? Why are we not setting the bar high and mirroring the top 4 year colleges so that we can attract the best and brightest students that would come to a first rate program to save money before transferring? The taxpayers don't even know that they are paying for this wild party.



    Jazz Fundraiser concert

    Wednesday, April 4, 2018
    7:30 PM - 8:30 PM (CT)
    Richland College - Main Campus
    12800 Abrams Road
    Dallas TX 75243

    Derrick Logozzo

    Featuring Jazz Vocalist, Kathy Kosins With the Richland Faculty Jazz Group The Brazos Gallery, Crocket Hall


    As a matter of sound educational practice, institutions recruit and admit students only to programs or curricula for which they show aptitudes and prospects for success. 71 NASM Handbook 2018-19II.H., I.
    Richland should operate like an accredited school must and carefully screen applicants and set them up for a paying career instead of making everyone that walks through the doors a music major. Then the students that are music major material should be on a degree plan from day 1 and only taking the necessary classes so that they can really practice for their 1 lesson (MUAP) and 1 ensemble (MUEN,) so that the program can build a reputation of excellence. The taxpayers shouldn't be funding this party that has legions of students that never graduate or transfer and have wasted hours on courses that do not lead to gainful employment.

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Excessive Hours | Office of the Registrar
    Beginning with fall 2007, UNT undergraduate students who are classified as Texas Residents and those who pay in state tuition rates will be subject to an additional excessive hour tuition rate. Please refer to sfs.unt.edu/tuition-and-fees for current tuition and fee information.

    Undergraduate Resident - College of Music
    Estimated Tuition and Fees for Fall 2019/Spring 2020 Estimated Cost
    Tuition $4,201.65
    Mandatory Fees $1,423.53
    Estimated Academic Fees & Differential Tuition $1,223.25
    Total $6,848.43


    Undergraduate Non-Resident - College of Music
    Estimated Tuition and Fees for Fall 2019/Spring 2020 Estimated Cost
    Tuition $10,531.65
    Mandatory Fees $1,423.53
    Estimated Academic Fees & Differential Tuition $1,223.25
    Total $13,178.43

    UNT encourages timely graduation for all students. Students are encouraged to seek assistance from their academic advisor to avoid enrolling in excessive hours...

    Texas Education Code § 54.014 specifies that resident undergraduate students who initially enrolled fall 1999 and later may be subject to a higher tuition rate for attempting excessive hours at any public institution of higher education while classified as a resident student for tuition purposes. Beginning with fall 2007, UNT undergraduate students who are classified as Texas Residents and those who pay in state tuition rates will be subject to an additional excessive hour tuition rate. Please refer to sfs.unt.edu/tuition-and-fees for current tuition and fee information.

    1. Undergraduate students who enrolled initially in the fall 1999 semester or subsequent semesters cannot exceed more than 45 hours of the number of hours required for completion of the degree plan in which they are enrolled. Any hours beyond 45 are considered excessive and will result in additional tuition charges.
    2. Undergraduate students who enrolled initially in the fall 2006 semester or subsequent semesters cannot exceed more than 30 hours of the number of hours required for completion of the degree plan in which they are enrolled. Any hours beyond 30 are considered excessive and will result in additional tuition charges.

    Courses that count towards the excessive hour calculation are those attempted at any Texas public institution of higher education. This includes:

    • Hours earned in courses in which a grade is earned on the transcript
    • Courses dropped with a grade of “W”, “WF”,”Q” or equivalent
    • Hours excluded from the student record resulting from Fresh Start

    The following types of credit hours do not count toward the limit:


    • Credit hours earned after a baccalaureate degree
    • Credit hours earned through examination, (AP or CLEP)
    • Credit from remedial and developmental courses
    • Credit hours taken at a private institution or an out-of-state institution
    • Credit earned prior to high school graduation

    Degree plan hours include the total number of hours required for a student to complete his or her degree plan. Students with excessive hours are encouraged to contact their academic advisor to review their degree plan and insure that it is complete, accurate and to verify the hours required for completion.
    Derrick Logozzo gave his Big Band Jazz a lecture along the lines of out of state tuition is not a problem???? And apparently, he mumbled something about 1 of the 2 students that have transferred to University of North Texas (UNT) recently. He talked of how they transferred a gob of hours (140 or a gillion?) some odd hours. The exact number matters not. The hours will be on one's transcript and all count toward the financial aid hours and in state tuition eligible hours. So when the total credit hours attempted exceed 150% of the hours on the degree plan financial aid ends and when the total credit hours attempted equals the degree plus 30 hours for most students (check the webpage/law) then the student will be charged out of state/non-resident tuition. Derrick Logozzo has no business putting any student in any class not on the Guided Pathway / Richland Degree plan or the degree plan for the transferring university. 66 is the usual maximum of transferable hours that will be applied toward the degree at the 4 year university! The Richland 60 hour Associate's Degree transfers as a block!

    When will this dirty advising end? Where is the DCCCD board???

    Last edited by Soapboxmom; 12-13-2019 at 10:47 PM.

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    https://texaan.org/Advising-Articles/7588017

    ......Byrd v. Dr. Horace Lamar (Alabama State University)[iii]
    is one interesting case brought under a breach of contract theory. In this case, Byrd chose to attend Alabama State University to pursue a degree in music media. This degree was listed in the University catalog, and the student was assured that he would be able to pursue this degree when he enrolled. However, the classes were either not offered, or if offered, were taught by faculty without the necessary expertise in the subject area, and without the necessary equipment to teach the classes.
    Byrd based his case on a contract theory, alleging that the university catalog and the assurances provided by the university’s agents (including the faculty and the academic advisors) created a contract with the student to provide the necessary classes for him to complete the degree. The Court held that the university was contractually bound by the promises it made through its agents and written materials. And as long as the student complied with such guidance in good faith, the University could be held liable for a breach of contract.

    In the area of negligent misrepresentation, perhaps one of the most disturbing cases for academic advisors is Sain v. Cedar Rapids Community School District.[iv] The plaintiff in this case claimed that the negligent advice provided to him by his high school advisor caused him to take a class not approved by the NCAA. This resulted in the loss of his eligibility to play basketball in his freshman year, as well as the loss of a college scholarship.

    While the Court quickly dismissed the plaintiff’s claim for educational malpractice, they ruled that the advisor could be liable for negligent misrepresentation under the same type of logic used when holding a professional, such as an attorney or accountant, liable for erroneous advice. The Court reasoned that advisors were in the “business” of giving advice and thus should be held accountable when a student seeks advice, that advice is provided knowing the student is relying on it, and the student then acts upon that advice in good faith. The Court then sent the case back to the trial court where the parties settled out of court.

    To establish a claim of negligent misrepresentation in Texas, the plaintiff must show; “(1) the representation in question was made by the defendant in the course of his business or in a transaction in which he had a pecuniary interest, (2) the defendant supplied false information for the guidance of others in their business, (3) the defendant did not exercise reasonable care or competence in obtaining or communicating the information, and (4) the plaintiff suffered pecuniary loss by justifiably relying on the representation.”[v]....

    Academic advising is generally considered a discretionary duty, and as long as the advisor acted within the scope of his or her job and has not acted to intentionally cause harm or mislead a student, then the institution must “defend, protect, and hold harmless” such an advisor.[vi]
    So what is a conscientious academic advisor to do? Act like a professional of course. As advisors who work with students all day, we are aware of the questions most commonly asked by our students: What do I have to do to graduate/maintain my athletic eligibility/meet my scholarship requirements? What should I do to prepare to move to the next level in my career path?

    As advisors and guides to a student’s path, we must continually seek out information to remain cognizant of the current requirements. This might include continuing professional development as well as collaboration with multiple departments across campus. We should be aware of all written information provided to students, including websites, brochures, catalogs, etc., reporting any noted discrepancies to supervisors.....

    They will not be our students forever; the goal is for them to successfully complete this stage of their education and move forward.

    The legal landscape can seem scary when we realize that the advice we give each day has the potential to land us in a court room. Particularly in the current environment where institutions of higher learning are being held more and more accountable for the success of their students, and where the student mentality has taken a decided shift towards a consumerism approach. It should come as some comfort that academic advisors are only held to a reasonable standard of care. An advisor who acts in good faith to pursue the best interests of a student should be protected from liability by both the institution and state law.

    CORE CREDIT HOURS FOR THIS AA DEGREE
    32

    REQUIRED MUSIC ENSEMBLE FIELD OF STUDY COURSES



    Select FOUR semester hours from the following:
    MUEN 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1151, 1152, 1153, 2123, 2141
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)
    4
    APPLIED STUDY


    I. Select EIGHT (8) semester hours in the major applied area of study of the following:
    MUAP 1101, 1105, 1109, 1113, 1115, 1117, 1121, 1125, 1129, 1133, 1137, 1141, 1145, 1149, 1153, 1157, 1158, 1161, 1165, 1169, 1177, 1181, 2201, 2205, 2209, 2213, 2215, 2217, 2221, 2225, 2229, 2233, 2237, 2241, 2245, 2249, 2253, 2257, 2258, 2261, 2265, 2269, 2277, 2281
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)

    II. Applied/class piano
    MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182; MUAP 1169, 2269, 2369
    8
    THEORY/AURAL SKILLS


    Select EACH of the following:
    MUSI 1116, 1117, 1311, 1312, 2116, 2117, 2311, 2312
    16
    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR THIS AA DEGREE 60

    Note: State universities are required to accept only 60 hours in transfer; therefore, it is strongly suggested that students check with their receiving university regarding the acceptance of any credit hours over the 60-credi-hour maximum.

    UNT states
    Undergraduate students who enrolled initially in the fall 2006 semester or subsequent semesters cannot exceed more than 30 hours of the number of hours required for completion of the degree plan in which they are enrolled. Any hours beyond 30 are considered excessive and will result in additional tuition charges.


    Richland Music Advisors should be following the AA degree plan above to the letter as it will transfer as a block! Students should be sent to Career Services, a Guided Pathways advisor to get them on this degree plan and the Transfer Center on day 1!

    Richland Music Advisors make claims that students can double major in things such as Audio Engineering, which the course catalogue proves is a bold-faced lie. In the last two years 1 Music Business class and audio engineering 1 are all that have been offered. The Richland Music Department Head bragged of a student that was doing conducting (who is well into out out state tuition due to dozens of hours of MUAP (private lessons) and MUEN (ensembles) that won't transfer.) Conducting is a junior and/or senior level course in a 4 year music degree and no conducting anything can be transferred. There are also Master's Degrees in Conducting.

    Richland is a two year college and the only music courses that should be taken are the 16 hours of Theory and Ear Training 1-4 (not Fundamentals which is not a college course,) 4 MUEN classes, 8 MUAP credit hours, 4 recital credits, and possibly the 4 credits of class piano 1-4 (or for advanced students credits of MUAP piano) to prepare for the piano proficiency exam required of all music majors. That is 32-36 hours of music plus the 32 core hours (of 42 in a typical Bachelor's Degree) that gets students their Associate's Degree and the piano that is advisable to take for a total of 64-68 hours only! Only 60-69 hours will transfer and count toward a Bachelor's Degree. Anything over that will go toward financial aid limits and rocket the student into out of state (non-resident) tuition at a Texas 4 year university (72% of transfer students end up at a Texas 4 year university.)

    The Music Advisors telling students not to worry about out of state tuition and loss of financial aid when music students have already exhausted their financial aid and are struggling to pay to finish their coursework at Richland and students are leaving with well over 100 hours to transfer may well be actionable in a court of law as the advisors have been informed numerous that those are issues. All levels of the administration, the DCCCD board and lawmakers have been made aware in writing. Richland Music Advisors are advising students into filling chairs in the Music Department. This dirty and predatory advising will be stopped!

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Can Private Schools or Colleges Be Liable for Breach of Contract or Misrepresentation? | Lawyers.com

    When Schools Mislead Students


    ......Some students have also been able to pursue lawsuits based on arguments that for-profit colleges or vocational schools convinced them to enroll by lying about things such as:


    • how long it would take to complete a course of study
    • whether the school would provide expert instruction in a particular subject
    • whether a student had the aptitude needed to complete a program, and
    • whether graduates would find plenty of jobs with good salaries.

    In a particularly high profile case, a group of students sued Trump University for fraud,.....
    DCCCD best start advising students honestly. Making virtually everyone who walks in the music building into a music major whether they have the aptitude to complete a degree or not and then putting them into dozens of hours over degree plans leaving them in danger of exhausting financial aid and paying out of state tuition because they are following what the Music Advisors tell them isn't going to end pretty!

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    McCluskey family suing U of U for $56 million | fox13now.com

    The McCluskey's have filed a $56 million lawsuit against the university after their daughter and her friends contacted police, housing officials, and counselors, dozens of times, reporting everything from extortion to threats of gun violence.

    “She did tell me that she thought she was bothering the police and that she was annoying them, that she was contacting them so much, and I told her that`s their job. They`re supposed to respond to you,” said Jill McCluskey.
    This family's daughter was harassed and murdered. Richland music students don't get adequate help when they report harassment either.

    Dozens of complaints about the dirty advising have not solved those problems more than a year later. How bad does it have to get before the students, paying parents and taxpayers see things run correctly and honestly? The issues are publicly documented here!

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare


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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    At Richland College, “Community” is the Key Word - Good Life Family Magazine

    “The public is not always aware of all the benefits of a community college education,” says Donna Walker, Associate Vice President of Enrollment Management and Superintendent of the Richland College High School. From the moment a student enrolls, the school offers a level of personalization you can’t always get at a large university. The faculty and advisors offer a “more intimate connectivity”, as they work with each individual to build their skill set, explore job options, and determine what certifications or degrees they will need to go out into the work force. Then they help them do just that.

    First-time college students are encouraged to take career inventories offered at Richland’s Career Services department. These help identify “aspects of your uniqueness” and suggest careers students may not have considered before or even knew about. One student was convinced he wanted to be a computer programmer because it was a lucrative profession, but when his career assessments revealed how his skills and interests were really not a match at all, he was able to revise the focus of his coursework to work toward another better-suited degree.

    Donna believes, “The fabulous part of working at Richland is we have students who wouldn’t otherwise be able to attend a four-year university.” ...And you definitely cannot overlook the affordability. “Students save thousands and thousands of dollars,” Donna reports, and they don’t incur the same amount of debt as they would at a larger university for the first two years.

    Community colleges were created to serve the community, and the students represent all walks of life.
    BS!!! The Music Advisors turn almost everyone who walks in the door into a music major. Skills, aptitudes and job options are not discussed. Degree plans and certificate options are not discussed. Students are kept away from Career Services, Guided Pathways Advisors, general advisors and the Transfer Center, so that Melissa Logan (choir director) and Derrick Logozzo (Music Department Chair) can load the students into dozens of credit hours of music classes that won't transfer in order to fill their music chairs.

    Students in the music department are usually put into Fundamentals of Music Theory which is not a college level course and adds an extra year to their studies at Richland. Excess hours that lead to exhausting financial aid and having to pay out of state/ non-resident tuition at a 4 year Texas College does not equal affordability. When is Donna Walker going to see that what the college promises is actually fulfilled? The advising is downright dirty, dishonest and predatory. Gobs of excess music hours are not the pathway to a paying career and food on the table. It is a recipe for disaster with exhaustion of financial aid and in state eligible credit hours that could go toward a real degree. And, check the records posted in this thread. Very few are graduating!



    Note: State universities are required to accept only 60 hours in transfer; therefore, it is strongly suggested that students check with their receiving university regarding the acceptance of any credit hours over the 60-credi-hour maximum.

    UNT states
    Undergraduate students who enrolled initially in the fall 2006 semester or subsequent semesters cannot exceed more than 30 hours of the number of hours required for completion of the degree plan in which they are enrolled. Any hours beyond 30 are considered excessive and will result in additional tuition charges.



    Richland Music Advisors should be following the AA degree plan above to the letter as it will transfer as a block! Universities will only accept between 60-69 hours in transfer. Everything over that counts toward out of state tuition and exhaust financial aid as all attempted hours count! Students should be sent to Career Services, a Guided Pathways advisor to get them on this degree plan and the Transfer Center on day 1!

    CORE CREDIT HOURS FOR THIS AA DEGREE
    32


    REQUIRED MUSIC ENSEMBLE FIELD OF STUDY COURSES



    Select FOUR semester hours from the following:
    MUEN 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1151, 1152, 1153, 2123, 2141
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)
    4
    APPLIED STUDY


    I. Select EIGHT (8) semester hours in the major applied area of study of the following:
    MUAP 1101, 1105, 1109, 1113, 1115, 1117, 1121, 1125, 1129, 1133, 1137, 1141, 1145, 1149, 1153, 1157, 1158, 1161, 1165, 1169, 1177, 1181, 2201, 2205, 2209, 2213, 2215, 2217, 2221, 2225, 2229, 2233, 2237, 2241, 2245, 2249, 2253, 2257, 2258, 2261, 2265, 2269, 2277, 2281
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)

    II. Applied/class piano
    MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182; MUAP 1169, 2269, 2369
    8
    THEORY/AURAL SKILLS


    Select EACH of the following:
    MUSI 1116, 1117, 1311, 1312, 2116, 2117, 2311, 2312
    16
    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR THIS AA DEGREE 60

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Performance majors take note. Music and theater folks end up in the same boat. Struggling artists really struggle! Logozzo and Logan should be sending all prospective music majors to the Career Services for a dose of reality!

    Houston Actors Relate Their Side Jobs War Stories | Houston Press

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    DCCCD states in writing:
    2019 - 2020 Catalog
    Academic Transfer Programs


    The college offers a broad range of educational opportunities for the student whose goal is to transfer to a four-year institution. In addition to offering a strong, creative foundation for the freshman and sophomore years, the academic transfer curriculum is coordinated with a number of Texas four-year institutions to ensure the transfer of credits. Although each four-year school is different,you may increase the likelihood of the transferability of your courses by being active and responsible in the advisement process. By consulting the four-year institution regularly and taking advantage of the resources available at the college, you may ensure that the transfer process is a positive experience.

    Another means of ensuring success in transferring to a Texas public college or university is to complete the core curriculum at this college since the entire core should transfer as a block of 42 credits. In addition, if you complete a Field of Study Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree, the curriculum will transfer and count toward the specific major at most Texas public institutions. To ensure guaranteed transfer, you are strongly encouraged to check with the university where you plan to transfer for specific courses within the core curriculum that would be required for your particular major.
    Excessive Hours
    Students should take care when selecting additional courses to be transferred toward a Baccalaureate degree. House Bill 1172 allows an institution to charge the equivalent of out of state tuition for credit hours taken beyond the state limits. State limits are:

    1. For students entering public Texas institutions Fall 1999 - Summer 2006 who attempt 45 hours beyond what is required for Baccalaureate degree (120 hours).
    2. For students entering Fall 2006 and thereafter who attempt 30 hours beyond the hours required for a Baccalaureate degree.

    It is recommended that students take minimal hours beyond degree requirements to avoid possible higher tuition charges at the institution to which they are transferring.
    2019 - 2020 Catalog
    Transfer Policy


    The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) requires all public colleges and universities to accept transfer of credit for successfully completed courses as applicable to an associate or baccalaureate degree in the same manner as credit awarded to non-transfer students in that degree program.
    Institutions are not required to accept in transfer more credit hours in the major area of a degree program than the number set out in any applicable Board-approved Field of Study Curriculum for that program. In any degree program for which there is no Board-approved Field of Study Curriculum, institutions are not required to accept in transfer more lower-division course credit in the major applicable to a baccalaureate degree than the institution allows their non-transfer students in that major. An institution of higher education may deny the transfer of credit in courses with a grade of "D" as applicable to the student's field of study curriculum courses, core curriculum courses, or major. No university shall be required to accept in transfer or toward a degree program, more than sixty-six (66) semester credit hours of lower-division academic credit. Universities, however, may choose to accept additional credit hours.

    Excessive Hours
    Students who plan to transfer are highly encourage to learn more about Excessive Hours.



    • 2019 - 2020 Catalog
      Guarantee For Transfer Credit


      Richland College guarantees to its Associate of Arts and Associate of Science graduates the transferability of course credit to Texas public colleges and universities. Students pursuing these degrees will complete the college's Core Curriculum. By Texas State Law, the entire Core will transfer as a block to all Texas public colleges and universities to take the place of the core curriculum of the receiving transfer institution. Students should work closely with an advisor in the choice of electives to ensure that the receiving institution has cooperated with the college in the development of Transfer and Equivalency Guides that clearly indicate how the receiving institution accepts the selected elective courses in transfer.


      Another means of ensuring the transferability and applicability of all courses within an Associate of Arts or an Associate of Science is to follow specific degree plans in specific majors that are called Fields of Study. A Field of Study plan has the approval of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The entire plan of courses is designed to transfer as a block of courses to all Texas public colleges and universities when the student majors in the specific Field of Study at the transfer institution.

      Richland College guarantees that a student may take tuition-free course(s) if: (a) A Texas public college or university refuses to accept in transfer core courses when the student has received the Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree; (b) A Texas public college or university refuses to accept in transfer courses listed in that institution's Transfer Guide; (c) A Texas public college or university refuses to accept in transfer all courses taken in order to receive a Field of Study Associate of Arts/Associate of Science degree.
      The conditions that apply to the guarantee area are as follows:
    • Transferability means the acceptance of credits toward the general education requirements at a Texas public college or university. The courses must consist entirely of those in the Core Curriculum, the courses outlined in an official Field of Study, and additional elective courses identified by the receiving university as transferable and applicable toward a specific major and degree in its Transfer Guides written within the last five years; and
    • Limitations of total number of credits accepted in transfer, grades required, relevant grade point average and duration of transferability apply as stated in the catalog of the receiving institution.

    The college works with a number of institutions to develop Articulation Agreements and Transfer Guides. To find out more about articulation agreements, transfer guides and other transfer information, visit https://www.RichlandCollege.edu/serv...s/default.aspx.
    In order to secure such a guarantee, students should begin the process in the college Counseling/Advisement Center to work closely with an advisor.
    To ensure guaranteed transfer, students are strongly encouraged to check with the university where they plan to transfer. No university shall be required to accept in transfer toward a degree, more than 66 semester credit hours of academic credits earned by a student in a community college. Universities, however, may choose to accept additional credit hours. Also, all public colleges and universities must offer at least 42 semester credit hours of academic courses that are substantially equivalent to courses listed in the Lower Division Academic Course Guide manual including those that fulfill the lower-division portion of the institution's core curriculum.


    • 2019 - 2020 Catalog
      Other Things to Consider


      During the time you are enrolled in the college, you should begin to determine the necessary steps for completing the transfer admission process. The process may require a great amount of preparation and you should be certain you understand all of the requirements for admission, such as:
    • Application deadlines,
    • Minimum grade-point average requirements,
    • Limits on the number of credit hours that are acceptable in transfer,
    • Excessive Hours
    • Policies regarding acceptance of repeated courses,
    • Housing information and
    • Financial aid application procedures.

    If you are applying for financial aid please be aware that federal regulations require that you must be enrolled in an eligible program of study in order to receive aid. To select an eligible degree or certificate program, please log on to eConnect and visit FA Program Selection. Please use care in selecting your program. This selection will affect the information your academic adviser will use to help you build your schedule and track the progress toward your degree.
    Of equal importance is a personal visit to the chosen institution. Many senior institutions plan special activities and campus visitation periods where you can meet with representatives from all areas of the institution.

    There is a limit on the number of hours taken by any one student in which the state of Texas will reimburse universities. By law, some Texas public universities may charge a higher rate of tuition to students who exceed the limit. Contact the college or university to which you plan to transfer and obtain more information concerning tuition fees.




    CORE CREDIT HOURS FOR THIS AA DEGREE
    32



    REQUIRED MUSIC ENSEMBLE FIELD OF STUDY COURSES



    Select FOUR semester hours from the following:
    MUEN 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1151, 1152, 1153, 2123, 2141
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)
    4
    APPLIED STUDY


    I. Select EIGHT (8) semester hours in the major applied area of study of the following:
    MUAP 1101, 1105, 1109, 1113, 1115, 1117, 1121, 1125, 1129, 1133, 1137, 1141, 1145, 1149, 1153, 1157, 1158, 1161, 1165, 1169, 1177, 1181, 2201, 2205, 2209, 2213, 2215, 2217, 2221, 2225, 2229, 2233, 2237, 2241, 2245, 2249, 2253, 2257, 2258, 2261, 2265, 2269, 2277, 2281
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)

    II. Applied/class piano
    MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182; MUAP 1169, 2269, 2369
    8
    THEORY/AURAL SKILLS


    Select EACH of the following:
    MUSI 1116, 1117, 1311, 1312, 2116, 2117, 2311, 2312
    16
    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR THIS AA DEGREE 60
    Student's transcript will indicate the Field of Study has been completed upon successful completion of the following courses:


    Four (4) semester hours from MUEN 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1151, 1152, 1153, 2123, 2141

    Eight (8) semester hours from MUAP 1101, 1105, 1109, 1113, 1115, 1117, 1121, 1125, 1129, 1133, 1137, 1141, 1145, 1149, 1153, 1157, 1158, 1161, 1165, 1169, 1177, 1181, 2201, 2205, 2209, 2213, 2215, 2217, 2221, 2225, 2229, 2233, 2237, 2241, 2245, 2249, 2253, 2257, 2258, 2261, 2265, 2269, 2277, 2281

    Sixteen (16) semester hours from MUSI 1116, 1117, 1311, 1312, 2116, 2117, 2311, 2312.
    The students go to the the manipulative music advisors, Melissa Logan and Derrick Logozo and have no idea that this information is posted on the DCCCD website or that they should be going to Career Services, Guided Pathway advisors and the Transfer Center for help. To the Associate's Degree students are required to add 4 credit hours of recital and 4 hours of piano class may be advisable (checking with 4 year university is imperative.) The Music Associate's Degree at Richland has only 32 of the 42 core hours built in. To guarantee that the core hours will all count toward the degree at a 4 year state university where 3/4 of students end up transferring to one must take the full 42 core hours at Richland and transfer them as a block after checking with the transferring university to see if that is their best option.

    Any student taking a single hour not on the above degree plan / Field of Study should have in writing that it is necessary to take from the college(s) the student is planning to transfer to. Derrick Logozzo treats the Richland program as a Bachelor's and Master's program combined, but it is only a junior college (two-year) program, so no one can transfer anything beyond what a Freshman and Sophomore take in a real music program. The 4 ensemble credits total (that are all that will transfer) are usually a large ensemble like Wind Symphony for instrumentalist and a large choir for vocalist. Logozzo and Logan have been putting students into Fundamentals of Theory which is not a college level course and gobs of ensembles (MUEN,) private lessons (MUAP,) and other music hours that will not transfer, but do eat up in-state/resident tuition hours available and exhaust financial aid hours available.

    Putting students in hours above the written Associate's Degree plan is predatory and nothing more than using trusting students to fill Music Department chairs. I refuse to blame the students (innocent victims) of dishonest advisors that tell them not to go to Career Services and the Transfer Center claiming those folks don't know what they are doing. Students believe that Logan and Logozzo are serving their best interests when they place them in classes as they should be able to. Tragically, Logozzo and Logan can't guarantee that every student will complete a music degree or get a full ride at a prestigious private school. Of the few that actually transfer, most will end up at a state university in Texas, so obviously, all music students should be following this degree plan unless they have the cash in hand to pay thousands in out of state tuition or can afford to attend a private college.

    Clearly, Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan are totally incompetent advisors that have done horrific harm to students. This bad faith advising should have gotten them removed a long time ago.

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Derrick Logozzo has been bragging of his students doing conducting work. More absolute bull different day!

    UNT as is universal for real schools of music states:
    MUAG 3800 - Fundamentals of Conducting

    2 hours (3;0)

    Fundamentals of conducting, including beat patterns, various gestures for attack, release and phrasing. Includes the use of the left hand, score reading, development of aural skills, rehearsal techniques and interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s): MUTH 2400, MUTH 2410. Junior standing.

    Meets with MUAG 5805

    MUAG 3800 is a prerequisite for MUAG 3820 and MUAG 3870.


    MUAG 3870 - Instrumental Conducting


    2 hours (3;0)

    Score reading and preparation; practical application of transposition for all instruments; psychology of conducting; multimeter patterns; stylistic considerations; extensive conducting practicum utilizing both wind and orchestral literature.

    Prerequisite(s): MUAG 3800, MUTH 2500, MUTH 2510.
    So, to take any conducting for credit one must be a junior and have passed Sophomore Music Theory. Therefore, no one at Richland is doing anything with conducting that will transfer. Logozzo's circus show that has destroyed the credibility of this department must end. It is high time to go back to staying on the degree plans and stop putting students into programs that don't exist at a junior (Freshman & Sophomore) college and excess hours that lead to out of state tuition and loss of financial aid. Out of state tuition is a thing!

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Richland College is known as a party and drug campus which is not surprising. I checked the roster for the Jazz Combo I am registered in for the spring semester and it looks like the drummer from Morgue Meat just may be the drummer in my class. I guess Richland needs to expand its offering of ensembles to include "brutal death metal" so that everyone in the community will be served!



    I notice that Music Department Head, Derrick Logozzo, puts the more colorful shall we say students and those students that can barely read music into the other instructors ensembles and not his own. Curious that. So much for running a legitimate program that will prepare students to transfer to a 4 year university.......

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    If the Morgue Meat drummer is the gentleman on the roster for the Jazz Combo I enrolled in, the Richland College Music Department Head is admitting students that might not be a good fit for a traditional music program that is supposed to be preparing students to transfer to real music schools in order to get certified to teach or pursue performance degrees.





    Morgue Meat


    April 8, 2013 ·
    https://www.reverbnation.com/morguemeat/song/16891143-embalmers-lust?fbclid=IwAR0qgzAm-QzlvgXbcpSutJse2VXzJBQ9tF--U40MaAhoyaSZ-_fGHQLI44g Check out our latest recording!! If you film a sex tape with this track as the background music and send it to us we'll send you a special prize pack and we'll include an all expenses paid trip to North Korea for you and your girl.
    Embalmer's Lust by Morgue Meat | ReverbNation

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    · Morgue Meat
    February 15, 2013 ·
    Party/house show tomorrow at 10 pm featuring us and Changing Channels!! For them real niggaz, and bitches bout that money. Be there!! Dallas tx 75229
    Morgue Meat

    December 27, 2012 ·
    Brutal Jams for all of you sick mother *******
    <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yoFbpOAx_XE&amp;fbclid=IwAR3HRyhKCXJsrgjWn oLzC hDVRhxTnyC3BrP7HYznjfNW9QAJMYje4-GO5_A" target="_blank">
    Morgue Meat

    August 9, 2012 ·
    make sure to come out and support Morgue Meat, Maldevera, and Exploder August 11th and **** **** up to some Monstrous Thrash and Sickening Death Metal!! this is our last show with our drummer James Herrada before he heads out to college and we want to make it as brutal as possible, come support Texas Death Metal and Texas Thrash!!
    How is this student going to do with Latin, swing, salsa, waltzes and the like?

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Our new drumming sensation is also into this:

    WTF Is Pornogrind? - Rolling Stone

    Richland Music students take few core classes. I guess it is time for an alternative music class. Maybe the students would actually show up for that.....

    299.jpg

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    DCCCD (The Dallas County Community College District) should be advising students according to the standards set out here:



    The Value of Advising
    Advising is powerful because it attends to core elements of each student’s success: setting academic goals based on transfer and/or career interests, developing an academic plan to attain those goals, and staying on track until those goals are met. Each of these big-picture tasks encompasses dozens of smaller ones. These tasks include:
    Raising aspirations and setting goals. Advisors meet with students individually and/or in groups to help students explore their academic and career options and set career and academic goals. As part of this process, advisors show students paths they might not have considered—such as transferring to earn a bachelor’s degree or pursuing a career path with higher earning potential—to help students improve their economic mobility.
    Developing academic plans and registering for courses. Advisors help students develop detailed academic plans to attain their goals. And of course, they help students identify and register for the courses they need each term.
    Helping students help themselves. Advisors point students to a variety of supports—including academic, financial, and social service resources—that students can use to improve their college experience and opportunities for success. This effort to help students better engage with their coursework, peers, and instructors often starts with orientation and continues throughout the students’ years at the college.
    Focusing on the big picture. Advisors analyze student retention data and use the findings to identify actions the college can take to improve overall student outcomes.

    The multilayered benefits of advising are well established: “Advisors help students make choices in a complex environment, often by explaining the costs and benefits of each available option, and they guide students to additional resources that will help them make good decisions.”²

    These good decisions have benefits beyond putting students on track to meet their long-term goals. In addition, they help students feel welcome and engaged. Perhaps most important, they help students experience early successes— meeting financial aid deadlines, enrolling in courses that advance their career goals, and so on—that build their confidence. Over time, these early successes accumulate and give students a strong foundation for persevering and meeting the challenges of completing college.

    For the first advising appointment, we try to get as much information from the student as we can … what their career goals are, what their major goals are, if they have plans to transfer because that is going to affect what program they’re in. . . . We definitely have conversations about if they’re working outside of school and their time management.

    Have in-depth conversations with students not only about degree plans
    and transfer opportunities, but also about current job markets, specific
    career opportunities and their earning potential, and career decisions
    based on those data points.


    ...guided pathways, build academic planning and advising into registration and require it for all students. Colleges across the country are implementing guided pathways, and that effort typically requires undertaking large-scale transformational change, including re-evaluating and updating advising models. Colleges take on this challenging work to improve rates of college completion, transfer, and attainment of jobs with value in the labor market—and to achieve equity in those outcomes.

    Central to the pathways model are clear, educationally coherent program maps—which include specific course sequences, progress milestones, and program learning outcomes—that are aligned to what will be expected of students upon program completion in the workforce and in education at the next level in a given field. Students are helped from the start to explore academic and career options, choose a program of study, and develop a plan based on the program maps. These plans simplify student decision-making, and they enable colleges to provide predictable schedules, frequent feedback, and targeted support as needed to help students stay on track and complete their programs more efficiently. They also facilitate efforts by faculty to ensure that students are building the skills across their programs that they will need to succeed in employment and further education.4

    ....students have conversations that cover topics such as setting career goals, making an academic plan, considering commitments outside of school, and understanding employment opportunities.
    On this campus, Coach knows everybody[If] you miss class, and the professor is aware that you’re an athlete, Coach is going to find out. Coach expects to see zero [absences]. If there are [any], there are going to be consequences.

    The college’s goal is for all new students to select a pathway during their first semester.


    Does your college’s advising include early career exploration? If so, is it for all students? If not, when does career exploration happen?
    1. How are advisors talking to students about transfer? Do your advisors ensure that students’ courses will transfer to their institution of choice and into their program of choice at that institution?
    2. Is advising consistent at your college? Are students receiving consistent information from all advisors?
    3. What is the faculty role in advising at your college? How do faculty members view their role in advising? How do faculty and advisors share information?
    4. How are advisors integrated into the classroom? Are faculty members encouraged to bring advisors into their classrooms?
    5. How are advisors monitoring student progress? How often do they talk with students about their progress?
    6. Is your college tracking data on advising and assessing student outcomes based on the data? Is assessing advising services, and revamping them if necessary, part of your college’s student success agenda?
    7. Are some students receiving more comprehensive advising services than others? What might disaggregated advising and engagement data reveal? Are you ensuring that students of color, for example, are being guided to programs of study that have high earning potential? If not, do advisors need training to ensure that they are intentional about avoiding bias? If different types of students are having different advising experiences, how can your college bring successful models to scale?

    What do your students and advisors say about advising? Consider holding focus groups to capture students’ and advisors’ thoughts. To download focus group guides to use with students or advisors, visit www.cccse.org/nr2018
    DCCCD's Richland College Music Advisors are not advising ethically. Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan are filling Music Department chairs. Logan and Logozzo do not send students to Career Services, the Transfer Center or Guided Pathway Advisors. Students who are not good candidates are brought into and kept in the program. Attendance in the music classes is abysmal. The Music Advisors just keep enrolling students into dozens of music hours that will not transfer, but will exhaust students financial aid and put them in danger of having to pay out of state/non-resident tuition. Derrick Logozzo badmouths the Guided Pathways and refuses to follow them. The Music Associate's Degree is 60 hours. A student following the Guided Pathway would have those 60 credit hours plus the required Recital classes (4 credit hours) and perhaps the Piano Classes 1-4 (4 credit hours) for a total of 68 credit hours. A student who has done exactly that will have a successful transfer and should they realize that they need to change majors, they will have 32 of the typical 42 hours of core classes and only 32-36 hours of music, so they can still change to a different major without too much difficulty. Logozzo and Logan's students with dozens of excess hours of music nonsense are completely screwed. They have out of state/non-resident tuition and loss of financial aid to look forward to. The records in this thread show students that have more hours at Richland than is required for a Bachelor's Degree. That is criminal!

    DCCCD need to remove these dirty advisors who are using and abusing students to fill their own classes. There are legal implications to this bad faith advising!
    Last edited by Soapboxmom; 12-20-2019 at 02:29 PM.

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare





    All of Derrick Logozzo's and Melissa Logan's students are falling through the cracks. This group which published the previous post's document discusses seeing that students complete a real 2 year program in 2 years in this video. Richland Music students are all apparently on the 25 year plan. Disastrous!

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Students give guided pathways a thumbs up – Community College Daily

    Students give guided pathways a thumbs up



    By Matthew Dembicki October 14, 2019 Print
    College students value guided pathways programs in helping them to select a major and its required courses, a new survey shows.
    About half (51 percent) of surveyed two- and four-year college students said they had changed their major at least once. A higher percent of two-year college students said they did so, compared to four-year students, 57 percent versus 47 percent, respectively. Overall, 18 percent of all surveyed students said their schools were less-than-moderately helpful in providing guidance on majors.
    A significant number of students participating in the survey also said they needed more clarity around courses and prerequisites. One-third said major/degree course requirements were unclear, and one-quarter said the same about prerequisites, according to the survey from Ellucian, a higher education software and services provider.

    Providing a focus


    Guided pathways programs appear to help students focus on a major and its required courses and pre-requisites.....
    The survey also shows students value technologies that help them stay on track, such as date-reminder nudges, proactive advising/targeted interventions, virtual one-stops and online “what if” tools for majors/degrees.
    “It’s essential that institutions look at pathways approaches alongside technologies that scale the student-advisor relationship to help guide students as they work towards their personal successful outcomes,” Kari Branjord, senior vice president of digital transformation, said in an accompanying press release.
    The survey also shows that community college students are more likely to give their institutions high marks (59 percent) for helping them choose a major that aligned with their career path, compared to four-year students (53 percent).
    The survey comprised 1,000 public and private college students, including 400 community college students. About 17 percent of the students in the survey attended college part-time.

    Delays equal higher costs


    Changes in majors often result in delays in completion and additional costs, according to Ellucian. Of all surveyed students, 39 percent said they needed to take more major courses as a result of changing their major, and 31 percent said they needed additional general education courses.
    About 28 percent said changing majors would significantly delay their expected graduation/completion date (by two or more semesters), with 23 percent indicating a slight delay (by one semester). Nearly one-quarter (23 percent) said it would result in increases in their overall tuition costs.

    Relying on advisors


    Students rely on support from advisors during registration, and they need more attention when they transfer, according to Ellucian. When they have registration questions, 57 percent of surveyed students said they asked academic advisors, 45 percent asked instructor/faculty members, and 39 percent asked other students. More than one-third (36 percent) sought advice from family members, and 31 percent went to a career center for help.....

    Questions about student aid, transferring

    In those meetings, the top topics of discussions for both two- and four-year students were academic plans, required courses and current courses, according to the survey. But there were topics that community college students discussed more often with their advisors than four-year college students, such as financial aid, the transfer process, college affordability or financial concerns, and emotional well-being/mental health.
    Not surprisingly, community college students want more guidance on the transfer process. In particular:

    • Two-thirds indicated that they want more advice from their community college on which courses are eligible for transfer credits. (One-third of students said they didn’t receive any advice from their college on this.)
    • 56 percent said they need more advice on how to transfer.
    • Nearly half (49 percent) want more help in choosing a four-year college.

    Ten percent of community college students said that they hadn’t yet received any support regarding the transfer process from their college.
    Four-year institutions also appear to have room for improvement in helping students transfer from a community college.

    • 64 percent of transfer students wanted more advice from their four-year institutions on which courses to take to fulfill major/graduation requirements.
    • 59 percent said they wanted more advice on which courses are eligible for transfer credit.
    • 46 percent wanted more advice about on-campus resources, such as housing and financial aid. (More than half of transfer students said they didn’t get advice about on-campus resources from their four-year college.)

    Fifteen percent of transfer students said they hadn’t yet received any support from their four-year institution.
    Most students change majors. With Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan putting students into dozens of credit hours of music that apply to nothing that will be devastating as students will face out of state/non-resident tuition when they hit 30 credit hours over the degree plan (150 credit hours) and lose financial aid at 150% of the credit hours on the degree. All attempted credit hours count!

    Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan are outright lying about what classes and how many credit hours total will transfer. If the credit hours are not on the degree plan for the transfer school and under the 60-69 hours eligible to transfer, the hours will count against eligible financial aid and in state tuition hours period! Logozzo and Logan advising so dishonestly has completely destroyed the reputation of this once very strong department that was the feeder school to UNT. The students being drowned in dozens of ensemble hours and private lesson hours that won't transfer keeps the students from practicing, doing the coursework for their other music classes and few core classes they are ever put in and forces them to miss countless other music and core classes for endless on campus performances. The filling of music chairs has dire consequences.

    The graduation rate for music students at Richland is abysmal. Most music students will realize when it is way too late that the music major was a poor route to take as for most it leads nowhere. The tiniest fraction might make it as performance majors. A few could make it as music education majors if they have a very strong music background and like to spend endless hours in a practice room. Only a handful ever transfer. The few that transferred recently are way over hours and most will face horrific problems because of it. Financial aid does not cover out of state tuition at a Texas state university where most transfer students end up.

    If Melissa Logan and Derrick Logozzo had advised honestly and in the best interest of the students they would be using the Guided Pathways. Students would take English 1301 and a math class their very first semester and only students that had a strong music background and demonstrated a true ability, aptitude and work ethic to succeed in music would even have been admitted to the program. A student following the Guided Pathway to completion would have 60 credit hours plus the required Recital classes (4 credit hours) and perhaps the Piano Classes 1-4 (4 credit hours) for a total of 68 credit hours. So, if students that changed majors early on they would loose only the few music credits one is actually supposed to be enrolled in and not be drowning in the piles of garbage that Logan and Logozzo are placing students in.

    DCCCD can see the same student records that I have posted in this thread. So, these advisors filling music chairs at the taxpayers, students and paying parents expense should have been removed a long time ago and the music department set up to mirror those at a real music school.

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare



    Hannah C.Garland, TX

    0 friends

    1 review

    12/18/2019

    I am currently a student in the music program and the faculty is the best that I could get and they really care about the students success. I am in the choir and the choir director is my advisor and she is very adamant on making sure things are fun but still productive. This is the best Music Program I have ever been in.
    One of Melissa Logan's little flunkies is gushing over the music program. This student was likely placed in Fundamentals of Music Theory, which is not a college level class, by incompetent advisor Melissa Logan and that will keep them stuck in this joke of a program for at least 3 years. Only a handful of students transfer and only a small fraction ever earn a music degree. The question is in 4 1/2 years what will this starry-eyed student be doing to make a living. Chances are it will not be in music and this student will be floundering with well over 100 credit hours from a junior college program that will do nothing to help them get gainful employment. After 90 hours financial aid at the 2 year /junior college level is exhausted. If this student eventually does try to finish a degree at a real 4 year university, out of state tuition/non-resident beings at 150 credit hours and at 180 credit hours financial aid is cut off.

    It is high time Melissa Logan be shown the door and a competent advisor that will discuss real career options, earning potential, the realities of pursuing music as a means to earn a living and have students utilize Career Services, the Transfer Center and Guided Pathways advisors be put in her place. Logan's Koolaid will wear off and these students are going to have to figure out how to make a living and have viable options for training and education. The music party will end for most and it won't be pretty!

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Richland College | Colleges
    | Noodle


    Alumni and Outcomes

    Graduation Rates

    1% of students graduated on time.
    8% of students graduated in six years.
    Richland College - Niche
    After College

    Median Earnings 6 Years After Graduation
    $34,100/ year

    Graduation Rate

    18% Richland 49% National

    Employed 2 Years After Graduation
    87%
    Those are astonishingly bad numbers. But, the records I have posted for music students alone are certainly abysmal. Very few graduate. The Music Advisors are not putting students in universally transferable and necessary core classes as this thread clearly shows. I will fight tirelessly to protect the students, paying parents and taxpayers by continuing to speak out about this outrage. These dirty advisors must be removed and the music program brought up to real college standards!
    captain_obvious.jpg

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    When students can't transfer college credits between colleges The Hechinger Report is a national nonprofit newsroom that reports on one topic: education. Sign up for our weekly newsletters to get stories like this delivered directly to your inbox.



    As March Madness nears its all-consuming climax, a less widely noticed kind of intercollegiate competition is forcing students to churn endlessly through the higher-education system, wasting their own—and taxpayers’—money.

    In this game, the players score but it doesn’t count.


    That’s what happens when students earn academic credit at one university or college, then try to transfer to another, which won’t accept it—even within the same states and systems. The result is that they end up spending far more time and money trying to finish their degrees, assuming that they even stick around to bother.



    This story also appeared in NBC News


    Klamath Community College (Photo by Roberto J. Galindo)
    It’s a spectacle that may not have gotten as much attention in the past as NCAA basketball, but fed-up policymakers are starting to push for changes in the rules.


    One of the most common complaints a legislator gets from a constituent about higher education is, ‘My credits don’t transfer,’” says Davis Jenkins, senior researcher at Teachers College, Columbia University, who has studied the issue.

    “This is so common, but it’s heart-rending,” Jenkins says. “And it also pisses me off as a taxpayer.”

    That’s because the problem is as costly as it is unnoticed.


    A third of students now transfer sometime during their academic careers, the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center says, and a quarter of those change schools more than once.


    When these students’ credits don’t transfer with them, they churn, seemingly endlessly, in college, piling up debt and wasting time repeating the same courses. It now takes full-time students, on average, 3.8 years to earn a two-year associate’s degree and 4.7 years to get a four-year bachelor’s degree, according to the advocacy organization Complete College America—further increasing the already high cost to families, and, at public universities, states. Only 61 percent of full-time students who set out to earn a four-year bachelor’s degree manage to do it within even eight years, Complete College America reports.


    Part of the problem is that public universities are largely funded based on their enrollment, not on whether students actually graduate. So while an institution has a financial incentive to take transfer students to fill seats left vacant when other students drop out, it may not have a financial incentive to help them successfully finish college and move on.


    ....Experts say the difficulty of transferring credits is a major reason students stay in college for so long. On average, students now accumulate—and pay for—a wasteful 80 credits toward associate’s degrees that should require only 60, and 136.5 for bachelor’s degrees that need only 120, Complete College America says.


    Take Karen Hernandez. She started at St. John’s University in New York and transferred after a year and a half to Nassau Community College, where, after another year and a half, she received an associate’s degree. Then she moved again, to Columbia University, where she hopes to earn a bachelor’s degree in art history and human rights.


    The first time Hernandez switched schools, only 27 of the 36 credits she had earned and paid for transferred. The second time, 55 credits transferred, out of 63. That means Hernandez lost 17 credits—and that, after three years in college, she is facing at least three years more to get a degree that is supposed to take a total of four years.
    “It has definitely prolonged my educational career,” says Hernandez, 23.


    Columbia wouldn’t accept credits for a class Hernandez had taken and passed in meteorology, for example, she says. “My dean said, ‘Well, we don’t know what that covers.’ I would think that would be so simple: It’s, like, about the weather.”
    But university faculty at some institutions often question the quality of courses taught by university faculty at others.


    “Snobbery,” Jenkins calls it. “Everybody feels that the way they do it is the right way,” says Janet L. Marling, director of the National Institute for the Study of Transfer Students at the University of North Georgia. “To admit that somebody else does it equally well can chip away at their foothold.” Adds Dennis Jones, president of the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems: “There’s just the natural faculty hubris that says, ‘If I didn’t teach it, it can’t be any good.’”


    Even where transferring credits is possible, it can be extraordinarily complicated and misunderstood.

    For example, while some credits from one school may be accepted by another, they may not count toward a major, something students often don’t find out until after they’ve transferred.


    “Students are told, yes, your credits will transfer, and, yes, technically they do,” says Alison Kadlec, director of public engagement programs at Public Agenda, who has held focus-group sessions with students about the problem. “But if they don’t transfer toward your major, that’s a waste of time and money.”


    That common experience stymied one frustrated student Jenkins met. “He probably wasted a year’s worth of courses,” Jenkins says. “It’s just a waste. These are motivated students, taking all these courses at their expense and ours, and they’re not getting anywhere. And that’s just wrong.”


    A study in Texas found that students sometimes didn’t even learn if their credits were accepted until as long as four months after they transferred to a new school.


    “It’s one thing if they’re swirling around because they don’t know what they’re doing,” Kadlec says. “But it’s another thing if these institutions can’t get their acts together to give them the information.”


    Improving the advising process costs money, however, and forcing students to go through it—even if it’s for their own good—can be risky. When Klamath Community College in Oregon made orientation and advising mandatory, its enrollment fell 20 percent, costing it about $800,000 in state funding, the college’s president says.


    Tired of waiting for universities and colleges to solve the problem, several state legislatures are now stepping in to impose reforms from the outside.........


    “We focus on losing time and money, but there’s also an impact on [students’] sense of hope and possibility,” Kadlec says. “Students are blaming themselves. And I’m listening to these stories and thinking, ‘Why aren’t you furious?’ And I think it’s because they’re thinking, ‘Maybe I should have known that these colleges are competitors.’”

    The Hechinger Report provides in-depth, fact-based, unbiased reporting on education that is free to all readers. But that doesn't mean it's free to produce. Our work keeps educators and the public informed about pressing issues at schools and on campuses throughout the country. We tell the whole story, even when the details are inconvenient. Help us keep doing that.
    All donations doubled through the end of the year.

    Jon Marcus

    Jon Marcus, higher-education editor, has written about higher education for the Washington Post, USA Today, Time, the Boston Globe, Washington Monthly, is North America higher-education… See Archive
    @JonMarcusBoston



    Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan are happy to use naive and trusting students to fill chairs. The school gets money based on enrollment, not on success i.e. getting students the courses they need to graduate with a certificate or Associate's Degree and prepared to transfer.

    Logozzo and Logan are welcoming students in as music majors if they walk through the door with no regard to whether the student has the background, skills and work ethic to complete a music degree. Discussions about careers, available jobs or earning potential for musicians are not occurring. Logozzo and Logan putting students into courses that are not college level (Fundamentals of Theory,) that don't exist (Voice Masterclass) and excess hours over the 4 MUEN (ensembles) and 8 credit hours of MUAP (private lessons) that will transfer is dirty advising to keep students trapped in the department and going nowhere. These students bring in $$$$$$$$$ while wasting their money and taxpayers money on courses that Logozzo and Logan know will never transfer. Logan and Logozzo are deliberately screwing the students by putting them into dozens of hours that they know won't transfer and will cause them horrific harm!

    The Associate's Degree / Guided Pathway will transfer as a block and the 60 credit hours called for in that should never be exceeded except for the 4 hours of required recital and perhaps 4 credit hours of class piano period. That block will still leave students possibly repeating MUAP as they will not be allowed in many colleges to transfer in at the junior level and all the core classes may not be counted toward the degree as requirements vary significantly from college to college and at 32 hours students are not core complete (42 credit hours) and may not have the appropriate prerequisites for other required classes. Students also fail classes and may need to drop classes, so every hour needs to be carefully planned. Transfer students are guaranteed to get burned. Only 60-69 hours will transfer from Richland!

    To add to the tragedy, these students are exhausting the hours that are eligible for financial aid (180 credit hours as in 150% of the typical 4 year degree.) Students are also being put into non-resident / out of state tuition when they transfer to a 4 year Texas State college as 30 credit hours in excess of what is required for the degree can result in students being charged the higher tuition. The colleges don't get further funding for students after the degree plus 30 hours.

    Logan and Logozzo are running a dirty program. Diane Hilbert, the Dean of Fine and Performing Arts, needs to remove these errant advisors and start running a music department that mirrors that of a real music school and that sticks to published degree plans to the letter!



    CORE CREDIT HOURS FOR THIS AA DEGREE
    32




    REQUIRED MUSIC ENSEMBLE FIELD OF STUDY COURSES



    Select FOUR semester hours from the following:
    MUEN 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1151, 1152, 1153, 2123, 2141
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)
    4
    APPLIED STUDY


    I. Select EIGHT (8) semester hours in the major applied area of study of the following:
    MUAP 1101, 1105, 1109, 1113, 1115, 1117, 1121, 1125, 1129, 1133, 1137, 1141, 1145, 1149, 1153, 1157, 1158, 1161, 1165, 1169, 1177, 1181, 2201, 2205, 2209, 2213, 2215, 2217, 2221, 2225, 2229, 2233, 2237, 2241, 2245, 2249, 2253, 2257, 2258, 2261, 2265, 2269, 2277, 2281
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)

    II. Applied/class piano
    MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182; MUAP 1169, 2269, 2369
    8
    THEORY/AURAL SKILLS


    Select EACH of the following:
    MUSI 1116, 1117, 1311, 1312, 2116, 2117, 2311, 2312
    16
    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR THIS AA DEGREE 60

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    Attending college is a more uncertain experience today
    ...It’s unsurprising then that remorse is a common feeling among graduates: More than half wish they’d studied something different or attended a different institution, according to recent survey findings from Gallup...

    Eleni Papadakis, executive director of the Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board in Washington state, said people tend to overestimate how easy it is to repay student loans.She then shows them a cost-of-living calculator in their state, so they can see how quickly their paychecks will be eaten up by expenses like child care and taxes. If students describe frustration with the classroom or concerns about falling into debt, she’ll recommend they consider an apprenticeship.


    We’re putting too many young people on that four-year pathway without considering how they learn and what juices them up,” Papadakis said.

    More than 90 percent of people who complete apprenticeships in Washington state are employed; and, six to nine months after they leave the program, they have median earnings of $80,600.


    No longer are apprenticeships limited to blue-collar professions like manufacturing or plumbing.
    IBM is rapidly expanding its apprenticeship program, for example. This year the company hopes to hire 450 apprentices, up from 200 last year. Successful candidates (a degree is not necessary to apply) are trained for 12 months in fields including data science and cybersecurity. And those who complete the program stand a good chance of being hired there.
    Plumbing, electrician, garage door repair, elevator repair, nursing and literally tons of IT / tech jobs which are extremely lucrative are going unfilled while Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan make every poor dear that walks in the doors into a music major that will most likely never get a degree in music or if they do run up tens of thousands in debt for a career in music that is one of the lowest paying professions on the planet. Financial aid at Richland ends at 90 credit hours or at 150% of any other certificate / Continuing Education programs. This Fantasy Land Music program has got to be put back on track before any more trusting students are advised into professional and financial disaster!

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    7 reasons—other than cost—that students don’t graduate

    April 15, 2019

    As graduation season approaches, the excitement can overshadow a harsh reality: The students we’re celebrating only make up about 41% of bachelor’s degree students who entered college four years ago.
    As for the remaining students—the ones who won’t be donning their caps and gowns this spring—there are a number of hurdles that could have gotten in their way.

    National Student Clearinghouse research says cost is the number one reason students fail to complete college in four years. But cost isn’t the only barrier students face.
    Here are a few other reasons your students might not graduate on time.

    1: They’re juggling work and school

    ...For example, students who work more than 25 hours per week struggle to pass their classes—and only 45% of students who do so manage to keep their GPAs above 3.0, according to Georgetown University‘s Center on Education and the Workforce.

    2: No one told them how many credits to take


    Students must take a minimum of 12 credits to be considered full-time students and qualify for federal financial aid. However, taking 12 credits per semester does not keep a student on track to graduate on time. (or for Richland Stdents Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan put them in dozens of hours that are not on any degre plan and not the core classes on the plan.)
    Most students aren’t warned of this discrepancy—and end up taking too few credits to graduate on time, Rebecca Torstrick, an Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs at Indiana University, told the New York Times in 2017.

    3: They transferred schools, but their credits didn’t come with them


    Roughly a third of students transfer schools, but 40% of transfer students don’t get credit for completed courses. Even in cases where colleges agree to accept a student’s credits, specific departments and majors are unlikely to do the same.
    Community college students who try to transfer their credits to a four-year institution can face an uphill battle.
    (Derrick Logozzo and Melisssa Logan don't bother to look at the Richland Degree plan / Guided Pathway of 60 hours that will transfer as a blockl or at the degree plans of the 4 year colleges students often transfer to. Logan and Logozzo are filling music department chairs. Anything over the 60-66 hours that will transfer leads to out of state tuition and loss of financial aid) Only 23% of community college students who intend to attain a bachelor’s degree successfully earn one within eight years. And on average, students lose 43% of their academic credits when they transfer.

    4: They fell into the “exploration” trap


    After a rigid high school curriculum, the freedom to choose between thousands of course options can seem liberating for first-year students—but can ultimately prevent students from graduating on time.
    Students overwhelmed by course choices often wait too long to take major requirements, only to discover those courses are full. Or they accumulate extra credits and bounce between majors, which lengthen their time to degree and tack on extra costs. (Logozzo and Logan make everyone a music major even though many in the department do not have the background, skills or true interest in music to possibly finish a degree. No real talk of the work required or the careers and job opportunities ever takes place. With out of state tuition and loss of financial aid exploring music is a disastrous idea. Look where many Richland Music students are that have well over 100 hours of music crap!)

    5: They got stuck in remedial courses


    Between 40% and 60% of first-year students take remedial courses in English, math, or both, according to a report from the Center for American Progress. But only 10% of students who begin their college career in remedial classes graduate on time. And two out of three remedial students don’t earn a degree at all, according to Columbia University‘s Community College Research Center.
    Remedial courses don’t count for credit, which gives students little-to-no motivation to do well—or even complete them. Students in remedial courses can feel like they’re “treading water,” since they’re paying for courses that don’t feel like they’re bringing them closer to a degree, says Tristan Denley, the Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Chief Academic Officer at the University System of Georgia. (Logozzo and Logan should be putting every Freshman into English and math from day 1. Core classes will transfer and apply to any degree. Music Theory 1-4 (not Fundamentals,) recital, piano class 1-4, 1 ensemble and 1 instrument lesson are all the music that any student should be enrolled in for the 4 semesters they attend Richland as that is all that will ever transfer.)

    6: They lack confidence


    One of the key differences between well-resourced students and students of lower socioeconomic status is a “resilience gap,” finds one EAB study. Many low-income, first-generation, and minority students are vulnerable to doubting their ability to succeed in college. These students question their place at university and may take any one misstep as a sign that they shouldn’t be there. (Logozzo and Logan loading them with music garbage that is not on any degree plan and not transferable burns these students out and leaves them with hours of garbage that will not apply toward any degree or certificate and the give up and drop out.)

    7: They couldn’t navigate the hidden curriculum


    One of the biggest challenges facing first-generation students is that they have relatively few adults in their lives who can help them prepare for college. When these students arrive on campus, they may struggle to understand how the institution works and what is expected of them. Navigating this hidden curriculum can make low-income and first-generation students feel unwelcome on campus.
    First-gen students can struggle to know where to turn to for help, even when colleges have a wealth of resources available. And when students encounter intimidating higher ed jargon terms, like “FAFSA,” they may overlook campus resources, like librarians or office hours.
    (Kolodner, New York Times, 4/6/2017; Templin/Deane, Inside Higher Ed, 10/8/2017; Marcus, Hechinger Report, 2/17/2016; Bruni, New York Times, 9/6/2017; Rosenberg, New York Times, 3/28/2017; Collins, The Atlantic, 9/5/2016; Zinshteyn, The Atlantic, 3/9/2016; Paterson, Education Dive, 9/12/2018; Kirp, New York Times, 3/5/2018; Supiano, Chronicle of Higher Education, 7/26/2018; Smith, Inside Higher Ed, 4/11/2018).
    Dirty advising destroys lives!

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

    West Texas A&M University: Business Office Cost of Attendance

    West Texas A & M University says:
    Please note, Texas resident students that exceed their degree requirements by 30 hours if enrolled for the past 10 years, or 45 hours if enrolled in or after 2006 are subject to 30/45 hour rule, which results in the student being billed at the statutory rate for international students, (current rate is $465 per hour), rather than $50 per semester credit hour as given in the rate tables below. For more information, please see the Office of the Registrar Policies web page.
    Reminder! When Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan tell you not to worry about out of state / non-resident tuition they are flat out lying! The Richland degree plan / Associate's degree is what one should follow to the letter. Recital is also required for the 4 semesters and one may benefit from piano classes 1-4, but that is it. No more than 4 ensembles and 8 credit hours of MUAP on 1 instrument should be taken as that is all that will transfer. 60-66 hours transferring is the norm! Logozzo and Logan should have been fired long ago for their dirty advising.



    CORE CREDIT HOURS FOR THIS AA DEGREE
    32





    REQUIRED MUSIC ENSEMBLE FIELD OF STUDY COURSES



    Select FOUR semester hours from the following:
    MUEN 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1151, 1152, 1153, 2123, 2141
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)
    4
    APPLIED STUDY


    I. Select EIGHT (8) semester hours in the major applied area of study of the following:
    MUAP 1101, 1105, 1109, 1113, 1115, 1117, 1121, 1125, 1129, 1133, 1137, 1141, 1145, 1149, 1153, 1157, 1158, 1161, 1165, 1169, 1177, 1181, 2201, 2205, 2209, 2213, 2215, 2217, 2221, 2225, 2229, 2233, 2237, 2241, 2245, 2249, 2253, 2257, 2258, 2261, 2265, 2269, 2277, 2281
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)

    II. Applied/class piano
    MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182; MUAP 1169, 2269, 2369
    8
    THEORY/AURAL SKILLS


    Select EACH of the following:
    MUSI 1116, 1117, 1311, 1312, 2116, 2117, 2311, 2312
    16
    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR THIS AA DEGREE 60

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    re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare


    Advising is a must for educational goals

    March 28, 2018 The most important part of every semester is here once again. It’s time for students to visit the academic advising office.
    Academic advising is not only a place for college freshmen but also for continuing education students. The mission of general advising is to “empower students to achieve their educational and career goals while becoming lifelong learners through academic advisement and planning.”

    At Richland, academic advisers can help students complete the registration process and choose a program of study, a degree or certificate that best meets their education goals. They also offer information resources and assistance to help students select classes that will transfer to a four-year college. (Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan ignore degree plans and place students in dozens of hours that won't transfer, put students in out of state /non-resident tuition when they transfer and run them out of financial aid in order to fill music department chairs. Only 60-66 credit hours transfer. The Music Advisors should have been terminated long ago and students sent to real advisors who care about seeing that they get into a program that will lead to employment, finish and transfer if that is the student's goal) For students who are struggling with their grades, academic advisers can help create a plan to raise their GPAs and develop time management skills.



    Adviser Stephen Levine, left, discusses a degree plan with Marisha Khan.

    Colleges are big and universities are even bigger, so it is easy for students to get lost.
    “It is very important for students to build a relationship with their academic adviser. The adviser would be an advocate for students,” said Cathy Robinson, associate director of Student Services. (Not using students to fill music department chairs!)

    Sometimes, registration and dropping classes can be confusing. Without advising assistance, students might waste time and money by taking unnecessary classes or classes on the wrong academic track. Richland offers a variety of class options, including full and flex terms comprised of six-week and eight-week classes.

    Dropping a class is easy. Students can just do it online in two minutes, but they might not know exactly how it will affect their academic status. They may not understand the drop policy and forget deadlines which can affect possible refunds and their GPAs.

    “Students have the information and catalogs. It’s online. But they do rely on advisers to make sure that they are taking the right courses,” Robinson said. (Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan outright lie to students and tell them that they are being put into classes that they need and that out of state tuition is not a problem. All attempted hours count toward the 150 hours maximum, degree 120 credit hours + 30, that lands a student in out of state tuition. 150% of the degree hours is the end of financial aid. Logozzo claims that the Transfer Center people don't know what they are talking about and stops students from seeing the real advisors and claims the Guided Pathways are wrong so that the music department numbers can be boosted with students that sit in dozens classes that they cannot transfer and shouldn't be taking. It is totally dishonest and predatory!)

    Academic advisers are available to meet with students throughout the year. The best time to meet with advisers is usually from the third to 12th weeks of the semester. At this time, advisers and students can sit down calmly to discuss what students’ needs are. Academic advisers would like to meet with students at least twice each semester.

    Registration is the peak advising time and students may experience extended wait times and other inconveniences.
    “We are still going to help them. We don’t turn anyone away, but the time is shorter,” said Robinson. “We want students to get the full benefits of our advising department and services that the advisers can offer.”

    For many students, academic advising is done on a walk-in basis. Students can also make appointments with individual advisers. The General Advising office, located in Thunderduck Hall, is open Monday to Thursday from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Students must be signed in 30 minutes in advance, or one hour in advance if they have a GPA below 2.0.

    Some students may not know or remember the date for registration, so it is also helpful if professors and faculty remind them.

    “We need all help from faculty.
    When they [students] see emails coming from advising or from the transfer person, don’t delete them right away. At least read them and try to put [the] information on their ecampus website so that students can have access to the information,” said Sara Perez-Ramos, biology/chemistry professor and chair of the Faculty in Support of Academic Advising group.
    The group’s goal is to build bridges among faculty, students and advising for an efficient flow of information.


    There is no communication at Richland. Diane Hilbert, Dean of Fine and Performing Arts, and her dirty music advisors keep filling their own classes and the music chairs with students who will be greatly harmed. Cathy Robinson, the head of advising, should have put a stop to this dirty advising long ago. The music program is a complete disaster.

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