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Thread: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    Academic Maps with Proactive Advising - Complete College America
    Far too often, students in American higher education wander aimlessly, picking from a smorgasbord of courses and degree requirements rather than choosing a clearly-articulated, full program of study. By....offering academic maps that provide semester-by-semester pathways to graduation, and using proactive advising to monitor progress and provide interventions as needed, states, systems and institutions can implement a framework and support system that help students choose a path, maintain momentum on their path and ultimately complete their degree.
    Why is this important??? State of Texas and DCCCD say:

    CORE CREDIT HOURS FOR THIS AA DEGREE
    32
    REQUIRED MUSIC ENSEMBLE FIELD OF STUDY COURSES


    Select FOUR semester hours from the following:
    MUEN 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1151, 1152, 1153, 2123, 2141
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)
    4
    APPLIED STUDY


    I. Select EIGHT (8) semester hours in the major applied area of study of the following:
    MUAP 1101, 1105, 1109, 1113, 1115, 1117, 1121, 1125, 1129, 1133, 1137, 1141, 1145, 1149, 1153, 1157, 1158, 1161, 1165, 1169, 1177, 1181, 2201, 2205, 2209, 2213, 2215, 2217, 2221, 2225, 2229, 2233, 2237, 2241, 2245, 2249, 2253, 2257, 2258, 2261, 2265, 2269, 2277, 2281
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)

    II. Applied/class piano
    MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182; MUAP 1169, 2269, 2369
    8
    THEORY/AURAL SKILLS


    Select EACH of the following:
    MUSI 1116, 1117, 1311, 1312, 2116, 2117, 2311, 2312
    16
    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR THIS AA DEGREE 60

    Note: State universities are required to accept only 60 hours in transfer; therefore, it is strongly suggested that students check with their receiving university regarding the acceptance of any credit hours over the 60-credi-hour maximum.
    The Texas Legislature established that universities will not receive funding for students entering higher education in Fall 1999 or later or who exceed 45 semester hours above the degree requirements. For students entering Fall 2006, this limit is 30 hours above the degree requirements. Students affected by the 30 hour rule
    Students who started Fall 2006 and thereafter and attempt 30 or more semester credit hours beyond the hours required to complete their degree could be charged tuition not exceeding out-of-state tuition rates for these excess hours. Students who have not selected a major are considered, by state law, to have degree requirements of 120 hours.
    For example: If your approved degree plan requires 120 semester credit hours, and you started your higher education between Fall 1999 and Summer 2006 then for every credit hour you attempt beyond 165 (120 + 45), you will be charged out-of-state tuition rates.
    If you started your higher education Fall 2006 and thereafter, then for every credit hour you attempt beyond 150 (120 + 30), you will be charged out-of-state tuition rates.
    P lease note that all hours in which a student was enrolled at any Texas public institution of higher education, community college or 4-year public institution, are counted for the 45 or 30 hour cap whether or not the hours are accepted for transfer
    Richland College Music advisors continue to put students into dozens of excess hours of music credit hours that apply to nothing except serving to exhaust students financial aid and leave them having to pay out of state tuition in their own state of Texas universities. The records posted in this thread show numerous students with 100-161 hours at Richland College where the Associate's Degree is only 60 hours and only 66 credit hours can be taken to transfer. At 90 hours (which an alarming number of these students hit) these students will have exhausted their financial aid and they will face out of state tuition when transferring to a Texas State university (which is where at least 79% of them will end up if they transfer.)



    DCCCD's Richland College VP Donna Walker's responses to my concerns with the Music Department (July 2019):
    Concern: Derrick Logozzo is registering students in excessive hours in music ensembles.

    o Response: Guided Pathway advisors are available to students to be advised for core classes and to register for their classes. Music coordinators are available to advise students for music classes. Guided Pathways advisors may register them, or students may register themselves for their courses. Music coordinators have been instructed to follow the Guided Pathway and may not require students to enroll in courses outside of the Guided Pathway.The Guided Pathway indicates that students are not required to enroll in more than 4 semester credit hours MUEN and 8 semester credit hours MUAP to complete that component of the Field of Study in Music. Should students choose to take additional courses, they have the option to enroll in continuing education sections of MUEN and MUAP and not accrue credit hours...Student enrollments will continue to be monitored to ensure alignment with the Guided Pathway.
    Clearly DCCCD and Richland are not monitoring anything as the pages of records posted here show. Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan have continued to openly defy the administration and completely ignore the Guided Pathway/Music Degree Plan. Students are being ruined academically and financially. Financial aid does not cover out of state tuition and few families can cough up the thousands of dollars in out of state tuition charges that students will face thanks to Logozzo and Logan. Logozzo and Logan placing students into dozens of credit hours of music that are not on any degree plan and exhausting financial aid with that garbage is fraud.
    Know the Problem

    The vast majority of college students in America do not graduate on time. Many never graduate. This happens because higher education rarely provides clear pathways to degrees, careers and further education. Excess credits pile up as students make poor early choices about majors. Extra semesters and years get tacked on as students take courses that don’t count toward their degrees or when needed milestone courses aren’t available. Worse yet, in the absence of clear direction, graduation rates stagnate and students end up with loan debt but no degree....
    Students are left in the hands of the dirty music advisors, Melissa Logan and Derrick Logozzo and advised into disaster! These advisors purposely do everything possible to keep students at Richland for as long as possible and put them in as many music classes as possible to artificially inflate enrollment to get dollars into the totally mismanaged mess of a department. When the students realize that they never had any business pursuing a music degree, they have already wasted most or all of their financial aid and have few hours of in-state tuition eligible hours at a 4 year university left. Lives are being destroyed.

    Purpose First

    Early decisions matter. Provide students opportunities to evaluate their interests and explore career options, using labor-market data to reveal trends and possibilities...
    Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan keep the music students under their thumbs. Students are not sent to Career Services, real advisors and the Transfer Center. They try to make everyone a music major and the few that pursue other majors are pushed hard to take numerous music credits that are not on their degree plans. Realistic discussions of career goals, earning potential of music related fields, the facts about financial aid and out of state tuition are not happening. Richland music advisors want to fill their chairs and get money into their disaster of a department. Though Richland has the best adjuncts available, the students can't really benefit from them. When one is taking 3-4 ensembles instead of the 1 on the degree plan and numerous lessons beyond the 1 on the degree plan, they cannot put in the 4-6 hours of practice time daily for their instrument and prepare for their other classes. The department is imploding. Attendance is abysmal and department is not mirroring the first two years of a real 4 year music degree. Music students spend years at Richland and few ever complete a 4 year degree.

    Students choose majors or programs, not random, individual courses. The resulting full-program academic maps provide a default sequence of courses that lead to on-time completion, indicating milestone courses – classes that demonstrate appropriate and timely progress – along the way. Additionally, academic maps should provide Math Pathways that are aligned to majors and career interests, offering a clear and relevant path to graduation.
    The records here show that Logozzo and Logan are not putting students into math and other core classes. Students are overloaded with music garbage that applies to nothing except exhausting financial aid and in-state tuition eligible hours.

    Default Pathways and Registration

    Students remain on their academic map unless given approval by an advisor to change course....
    Logozzo and Logan refuse to follow the Guided Pathways / Music degree plans. Putting students into Fundamentals of Theory (not a college level class, not on any degree plan and not transferable) keeps them trapped filling music chairs for an extra year. Piles of ensembles and lessons are turned into playtime to fill chairs and get more state $$$ and financial aid $$$ into the department, but students have no idea that they can only transfer 4 ensemble hours and 8 lesson ( MUAP) hours and that the degree is not fun, but real hard work to attain. Students are told that it is cheap lessons and that they need all this garbage the advisors place them in. Those that have transferred find out when they get the bill for out of state tuition (a horrifically painful surprise) that they were screwed over by these advisors that they trusted.

    Act

    Successfully implementing Academic Maps with Proactive Advising requires intentional planning and a constant feedback loop with stakeholders. Though important to assess and accommodate the specific needs of your institution, it is also beneficial to draw on proven best practices....
    I have fought since November of 2018 to get this addressed. There is virtually no communication in DCCCD. It is obviously run dirty to get more money into the music department with no regard for the students and their paying parents or the beleaguered taxpayers footing the bill for thousands of credit hours that apply to nothing and don't transfer. This is total fraud!

    Provide professional development and training opportunities for all stakeholders involved in implementation of the reform and stick to the timeline developed by the implementation teams. Document the implementation and provide opportunities for stakeholders to connect and problem solve throughout the execution of the strategy.
    Instead of preparing students for gainful employment, they are getting signed up for piles of nonsense to fill music chairs and fund a disaster of a music department. The music advisors should have been replaced ages ago with department leaders that will run the department by the book and follow degree plans. The kindergarten atmosphere, abysmal attendance and advising shenanigans should never have happened to begin with! DCCCD was involved in getting Guided Pathways integrated into college programs, but months down the road is not ensuring the advisors follow them. DCCCD is a disorganized mess that is wasting tax dollars galore.
    Last edited by Soapboxmom; 03-26-2020 at 07:29 PM.

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    A new way to achieve student success in college: Take away their choices
    Now some institutions that once let students sink or swim are trying to confront this problem by taking critical choices away from them. A small but growing number of schools have even started picking their students’ first-year courses for them. They’re also monitoring them as closely as their parents might have for signs that they’re falling into trouble, and stepping in as needed to painstakingly shepherd them to graduation.


    At FIU, arriving freshmen in the business school are now being put through a newly revamped required course that helps make sure they’ve made the best decision — “to really look at, are they in the right major, and having them start to think about that earlier,” said Richard Klein, associate dean of the undergraduate school of business.

    “I can’t have them get to junior year and decide they don’t want to be an accounting major,” Klein said. “They might be here an extra year if they make those decisions very late.”


    The school has also started limiting the number of times a student can drop a class and then take it again to get a better grade — an easy out but yet another kind of bad decision that costs extra time and money. Before the restrictions were imposed, Klein said, one FIU undergraduate had started and then dropped the same course 13 times.

    “Part of what we’ve begun to do is rein back some of the choices that allow these students to get into trouble.”

    Richard Klein, associate dean, R. Kirk Landon Undergraduate School of Business, Florida International University
    Part of what we’ve begun to do is rein back some of the choices that allow these students to get into trouble,” Klein said. That’s among the reasons that the business school’s on-time graduation rate has jumped from 31 percent to 45 percent in just two years, he said.


    DCCCD's Richland College needs new advisors / department leaders in the music department so students can get this kind of real help and we can start graduating students while also serving community members who come in just to take and ensemble and perhaps a half hour ( 1 credit private lesson ) for personal enjoyment.

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    Undergraduate Credit Limitation (the 150-hour rule) < The University of Texas at San Antonio
    University of Texas San Antonio states:
    Undergraduate Credit Limitation (the 150-hour rule)

    Section 54.014 of the Texas Education Code was amended during the 76th legislative session to allow institutions of higher education to charge a higher tuition rate to resident students for semester credit hours attempted in excess of 45 semester credit hours above those required for completion of a degree program. The law applies only to new undergraduate resident students beginning in Fall 1999 or later. The 79th legislative session reduced the semester-credit-hour limitation to 30 semester credit hours for all new undergraduate resident students who enroll for the first time in Fall 2006 or thereafter. The result is that all undergraduate students must complete their degree requirements within 150 semester credit hours.

    The 45 (or 30) hours include courses which are repeated, duplicated, or courses for which the student received a grade of “W.” Although the law allows some exclusions (hours earned as high school credit and developmental courses), hours for courses passed, failed, withdrawn, and dropped are counted in the 45 (or 30) hours if the student took them while paying resident tuition at a public institution in Texas (Richland College.) Students are encouraged to seek academic advising and to follow the official degree plan in the approved catalog of graduation.

    Resident undergraduate students who initially enrolled during or after the Fall 1999 Semester and who enroll in courses in excess of 45 semester credit hours above those required for completion of their degree program will be assessed an additional charge per semester credit hour (for amount, see Additional College and Course Fees and Incidental Charges section of this publication). Effective Fall 2006, all new undergraduate resident students will be assessed the higher tuition rate for semester credit hours attempted in excess of 30 semester credit hours above those required for completion of a degree.

    In rare cases, an undergraduate student may have experienced exigent circumstances that would explain the need to complete the degree beyond 150 semester credit hours. In those cases, a student may petition to appeal a charge incurred because of the 150-hour rule. The circumstances must have been severe, ongoing and must have directly affected the student, such as hospitalization of the student. Appeal packets must include official documentation of the exigent circumstances. Students with questions or who wish to appeal this policy due to extenuating circumstances should contact their assigned academic advisor.
    excess credit hours rule | TexAgs
    sharkenleo 1:19a, 12/11/11

    I'm gonna be going over 160 hours after this semester, which is the credit hour limit for my degree, so I'll have to pay out of state tuition which is almost $5000 more. There is no way in hell I can afford this, as my financial aid won't cover this. Really frustrating considering next semester will be my last.

    Is there any way around this? I know they have an appeals system but they ask for evidence such as a death certificate or medical bills, neither of which I have.
    ....

    sharkenleo 2:55a, 12/11/11

    Yes, I'm certain because I got the bill from sbs today.......

    Boiling Denim 2:07p, 12/11/11

    You're screwed they want their money and they're gonna get it.

    The program I was on essentially had me get a degree in all but name only before transferring to finish an engineering degree(and in turn get the first degree without any extra work). The hours didn't reset and no one even warned me this would happen. I thought it was bullcrap so I appealed but lost.

    RustyBoltz 2:22p, 12/11/11
    AG

    The rule is the semester you start with more than 30 hrs over the required for your degree, you pay outta state tuition. It sucks but one semester didn't put you in that position and if you had planned you past few semesters you could have avoided it.
    I know I'm gonna be close to being 30 over the mech engr required 128 so I planned it out...
    UT Permian Basin States:
    Excess Hours

    As authorized by state law, a student who pays resident tuition rates and who attempts hours that exceed a designated limit will be charged the nonresident tuition rate.

    Thirty Credit Hour Limit Rule

    Beginning the fall 2006 semester, first time freshmen, and entering freshmen thereafter, will be under the 30 Plus Hour Rule. The rule states that students who attempt more than 30 credit hours over their degree plan at Texas State funded institutions of higher education and have not yet earned a baccalaureate degree will be charged out-of-state tuition.Attempted hours include hours a student is registered for through the census class day. Any courses dropped prior to the census class day will not be considered attempted hours by the State. Students who have transcripted course work prior to the Fall of 2006 are grandfathered from the 30 Plus Hour Rule, but may be affected by the Forty-Five Credit Hour Limit Rule.

    The following semester credit hours are not included in the calculation:

    • semester credit hours earned by the student 10 or more years before the date the student begins the new degree program under the Academic Fresh Start Program of the Texas Education Code, § 51.931;
    • hours earned by the student before receiving a baccalaureate degree that has previously been awarded to the student;
    • hours earned by the student by examination or similar method without registering for a course
    • hours from remedial and developmental courses, workforce education courses, or other courses that would not generate academic credit that could be applied to a degree at the institution if the course work is within the 27-hour limit at two-year colleges and the 18-hour limit at general academic institutions
    • hours earned by the student at a private institution or an out-of-state institution; and
    • hours not eligible for formula funding
    • Doctoral students who receive resident tuition may also be charged the nonresident tuition rate after exceeding the designated limit of 100 semester credit hours.

    For more information contact the Registrar Office at (432) 552-2635
    CORE CREDIT HOURS FOR THIS AA DEGREE
    32

    REQUIRED MUSIC ENSEMBLE FIELD OF STUDY COURSES


    Select FOUR semester hours from the following:
    MUEN 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1151, 1152, 1153, 2123, 2141
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)
    4
    APPLIED STUDY


    I. Select EIGHT (8) semester hours in the major applied area of study of the following:
    MUAP 1101, 1105, 1109, 1113, 1115, 1117, 1121, 1125, 1129, 1133, 1137, 1141, 1145, 1149, 1153, 1157, 1158, 1161, 1165, 1169, 1177, 1181, 2201, 2205, 2209, 2213, 2215, 2217, 2221, 2225, 2229, 2233, 2237, 2241, 2245, 2249, 2253, 2257, 2258, 2261, 2265, 2269, 2277, 2281
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)

    II. Applied/class piano
    MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182; MUAP 1169, 2269, 2369
    8
    THEORY/AURAL SKILLS


    Select EACH of the following:
    MUSI 1116, 1117, 1311, 1312, 2116, 2117, 2311, 2312
    16
    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR THIS AA DEGREE 60

    Note: State universities are required to accept only 60 hours in transfer; therefore, it is strongly suggested that students check with their receiving university regarding the acceptance of any credit hours over the 60-credi-hour maximum.

    Melissa Logan and Derrick Logozzo are putting students into excess hours that will almost guarantee that these students will have to pay out of state tuition at a Texas state university with financial aid not available to cover it. Very few universities accept appeals and those that do require extenuating circumstances. The Richland Degree plan above plus 4 credit hours of piano class and 4 credits of recital are all a student should take without the school they are transferring to putting any additional hours as required in writing. Logozzo and Logan should have been removed long ago for their dirty advising to fill music chairs leaving students in financial jeopardy. Students should be able to trust their advisors. Students should seek legal advice when charged out of state tuition by a Texas university so that Logan and Logozzo can be held accountable for misleading and abusing trusting students. 60-66 credit hours will transfer, but all attempted hours count against the total period!

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    DCCCD chancellor addresses economic trends — Richland Student Media
    Ninety-nine percent of new jobs created since 2008 require education beyond high school. The statistics are staggering for the current and future economy.


    “Sixty percent of jobs by 2030 will require post-secondary education,” May said. “Right now, in Dallas, we have 431,000 individuals that are illiterate.”


    May said Dallas has the lowest percentage of adults with a college degree in any urban city in the nation, which affects the lives of about 50 percent of the population. The economy is leaving those people behind.


    “The DCCCD way is about caring how a community succeeds,” May said. He emphasized that part of the need for the network is to address student suffering. He said the top request of students is food.


    “Our students are hungry. They don’t have the resources for food today,” May said. “Thirty-nine percent of students are missing meals on a regular basis. Some are missing meals almost on a daily basis.”


    May said the goal of the community college system is to prepare individuals for careers, but when they get to college 18 percent of students never finish a single course.


    “I believe we can change this direction overall,” he said. “I believe that that can only happen if we assume leadership to help our students in ways we haven’t done before. If I don’t do it and you don’t do it, we all don’t do it, I don’t know … who will?...”


    “The Promise is about one thing and one thing only. It’s about eliminating barriers and removing friction from the process,” May said. “We’ve created one webpage, one site that students can go to and commit to go to college.”

    High school students are asked to sign a waiver so DCCCD officials can start communicating with them on a regular basis.

    Part of that process involves completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

    “There’s one measure that is a better predictor of whether or not a person goes to college,” May said. “It’s whether or not they complete the FAFSA. If they complete the FAFSA, they are twice as likely to go to college as the student who does not.”


    May said that half of DCCCD students who are prepared to transfer never make the transition to college.
    “They, on average, will live a life of poverty,” he said. “Their salaries are the absolute lowest of any of our students. Even if they are in a technical field and drop out without completing, those students actually outearn our students who don’t prepare.”


    May said the goal of Dallas Community Colleges is for 60 percent of students to graduate college with a high value certificate or degree within six years.


    “We start with the Dallas high schools. Then we inject the Promise into the program,” May said. Then it’s possible to tie into a partnership with our Post-Secondary partners.”


    DCCCD Chancellor, Dr. May, is clueless about parts of DCCCD. Putting students into the hands of dishonest advisors like those in Richland College's music department will not get them an Associate's Degree and transferred to a 4 year university. The Richland Music Advisors will exhaust their financial aid (credit hours attempted count toward the financial aid limit limit whether financial aid is applied for or received) with garbage music credit classes for at least 3 years or more that are not on any degree plan and apply to nothing. Students will also land in out of state tuition (which financial aid doesn't cover) at a 4 year Texas University and be unable to complete a degree due to the mountains of garbage credit hours of music.

    The music advisors at Richland are dooming most of their advising victims to a life of poverty as they do not send students to Career Services, real advisors and the Transfer Center, but instead use them to fill music chairs and bring $$$$ into the department at the expense of trusting students. This is financial aid fraud and is bilking the taxpayers.

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    25 Highest Paying Jobs Without A Degree | Best Jobs Rankings | US News Careers

    Lots of jobs the music advisors aren't going to send students to the Career Services to explore.

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    Melissa Logan's Richland college choir student sent me this:
    it’s funny all the **** you talk about the Richland Music program, but are constantly in our halls. gtfo
    Does that make it clear that the Richland College music program has students that would not be admitted and retained in any legitimate choral program. Certainly not public school educators in the making. I am actually looking out for the ignorant fools like this who are being put into excess hours that will leave them facing out of state tuition charges at a 4 year university due to Melissa Logan's totally predatory and incompetent advising that is her way to fill her music chairs. These students may also be advised into exhausting their financial aid. Please note that real music schools follow degree plans unlike Richland. Not to mention that these students may not have the background, skills and work ethic to make it in a music program at a real music school (4 year university program,) but at Richland everyone is pushed to be a music major or take gobs of music classes that are not on any degree plan.

    These students don't understand that admittance into 4 year universities is competitive. One top Richland student for example was not admitted to 2 of the 4 music programs they auditioned for. They were admitted to 1 and another offered them a scholarship. That student is one of the very dedicated ones who has also been really careful about counting their credit hours. That student will make it and do fantastic. Most students in the Richland Music department rack up well in excess of 100 hours and never do anything in music much less finish an Associate's or Bachelor's Degree. I know the drill as I left with a vocal scholarship and finished up a Bachelor's of Music at what is now Texas A & M Commerce.

    Richland College has the best adjuncts bar none, but the leadership has run the program into the ground. Advising students into dozens of excess hours not on any degree plan is totally unethical and is destroying the department's reputation. Putting students into the program that do not have the background, skills and work ethic to succeed is totally unethical. Retaining students that do not attend regularly and that are not putting the the work required is also totally unethical. No real music program gives A' and B's (passing grades) to students in ensembles that miss numerous rehearsals and skip performances. Richland College is not mirroring the first two years of a legitimate music program.

    Why is it many of these ignorant fools do not go to the reals advisors, Career Services and the Transfer Center? Why aren't they getting in touch with the schools they may wish to transfer to and getting the facts? Richland College is turning into a party and drug campus and these students aren't even bright enough or motivated enough to answer me with any facts. I challenge these choir students to prove to me how brilliant their advisor / Choir Director Melisa Logan is. If there is anything I have posted that needs to be corrected let's have it.

    I am not going to "gtfo." I am going to see that the advisors that are refusing to follow the degree plans / Guided Pathways are held accountable. The thread here clearly details the serious ongoing problems in this program that must be addressed. I as a taxpayer, paying parent, alumna, and current student will not sit back quietly while this program wastes $$$$ and implodes do to DCCCD's gross mismanagement.

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    College students beware: Changing majors is expensive (so is getting advised by Richland College Music advisors)


    By Brandon Farner, Meghan MDermott and Giovanni Pantoja

    Special to the Star-Telegram


    College students, unsure about what they want to do with their lives, often change majors (or take piles of crap that Melissa Logan and Derrick Logozzo at Richland College have put them into), sometimes more than once.

    But students, take note. Your indecisiveness can come with a high price at Texas’ public universities.

    At many state schools, changing majors may mean almost starting over on coursework, extending the college stay by a year or more. Once students earn 150 hours — essentially five years of schooling — the state stops subsidizing their education and the students must pay out-of-state tuition, says Lacey Thompson, director of operations at the University of North Texas’ financial aid office.
    Read more here: Access Denied

    “And then to complicate matters, this excess-hour tuition you are getting charged, federal aid won’t pay for it, “ Thompson says. That’s because there are two cutoff points for aid, one state and one federal. Texas cuts funding at 150 credit hours and federal aid disappears after 180 hours, meaning students can no longer get federal grants or more-flexible federal loans to finish a degree.

    Going to community college first to save money, ironically, can increase the cost. That’s because the average student who completes a two-year associate degree at a Texas community college takes a whopping 98 credit hours to do so, according to a 2013 study of Texas colleges by Complete College America, a nonprofit that aims to improve graduation rates.

    To make matters worse, that associate degree may not include many courses needed for a four-year major.

    The costs to students are huge. Based on UNT’s tuition calculator, an in-state student will pay about $5,260 in tuition and fees for a 15-credit-hour semester.
    Because of the out-of-state tuition and fees, a student with more than 150 hours will pay more than twice that, $11,380.

    More than 500 UNT students are in this predicament every semester, meaning they are paying more than $3 million a year in additional tuition and fees.

    Malachi Galeano, a UNT student who changed his major from journalism to fashion merchandising to a catchall called integrative studies, is no longer eligible for financial aid. He finds the situation stressful and even considered quitting short of a degree.

    But he decided, “you just have to keep pushing.”

    Noe Mendoza, another UNT student, changed majors three times, from psychology to kinesiology to biology, and then ended up in integrative studies. “I didn’t know the effects when I changed majors because I was never informed by any adviser of any of the consequences of many hours, “ Mendoza said. (Logozzo and Logan don't want students to know as they want to fill music chairs. They have lied to students and claimed that financial aid and out of state tuition are nothing to worry about)

    “The reason I changed my major was because I felt I had more job opportunities after graduation, but that wasn’t really the case.”
    Mendoza has paid tuition on his own for the last two semesters, working over the summer and using credit cards. He still has another year to go.

    ’Excess college credit problem’

    The concept of what’s known as “excessive hours” was intended to encourage Texas students to work faster toward degrees. Starting in 1999, students with 45 or more hours over the number needed to graduate lost state funding.

    The state education code was updated in 2005, requiring Texas students who enrolled in fall 2006 or later to complete their degrees with no more than 30 extra credit hours if they want to pay in-state tuition. (Hours earned while in high school or through Advanced Placement exams don’t count.).....

    Community college conundrum

    While many students start at community colleges because they’re cheaper, students there often accumulate way too many hours.
    James Vernado, a longtime counselor at Tarrant County College, says students who enter are often unsure about what they want to do. “People are looking for a comfort level, something that fits their personality. You know a career is like a marriage - you have got to be compatible, “ he said.

    ....But those courses may not count toward a four-year major. Once students realize that, they will transfer to a four-year school — but by then, they may have 70 credit hours or more.....

    .......UNT would like potential transfer students to talk to its advisers about requirements before they reach the point of transferring......

    Read more here: Access Denied
    CORE CREDIT HOURS FOR THIS AA DEGREE
    32
    REQUIRED MUSIC ENSEMBLE FIELD OF STUDY COURSES


    Select FOUR semester hours from the following:
    MUEN 1121, 1122, 1123, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1151, 1152, 1153, 2123, 2141
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)
    4
    APPLIED STUDY


    I. Select EIGHT (8) semester hours in the major applied area of study of the following:
    MUAP 1101, 1105, 1109, 1113, 1115, 1117, 1121, 1125, 1129, 1133, 1137, 1141, 1145, 1149, 1153, 1157, 1158, 1161, 1165, 1169, 1177, 1181, 2201, 2205, 2209, 2213, 2215, 2217, 2221, 2225, 2229, 2233, 2237, 2241, 2245, 2249, 2253, 2257, 2258, 2261, 2265, 2269, 2277, 2281
    (Courses may be repeated for credit.)

    II. Applied/class piano
    MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182; MUAP 1169, 2269, 2369
    8
    THEORY/AURAL SKILLS


    Select EACH of the following:
    MUSI 1116, 1117, 1311, 1312, 2116, 2117, 2311, 2312
    16
    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR THIS AA DEGREE 60

    Note: State universities are required to accept only 60 hours in transfer; therefore, it is strongly suggested that students check with their receiving university regarding the acceptance of any credit hours over the 60-credi-hour maximum.
    Richland students should take this plus 4 credits of recital and the sequence of 4 piano classes and not one credit more!!!!! Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan should have been shown the door ages ago!

    Don't end up in the mess these students are in!

    NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    i’ve never wanted to get the coronavirus and go straight to school more than right mf now

    how is DCCCD gonna cancel every school event EXCEPT classes?? how does that make any sense i hope i get the damn virus so i can take my happy ass to classes then hope y’all like that
    Exact quote of one of Melissa Logan's star little choir students. And, now I am getting lawsuit threats from some other clown for sharing a public post???? Melissa Logan needs to be replaced with someone who will audition in qualified, serious students and run that department like a real music school. I shouldn't have to fight to get honest advising and degree plans followed.

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    fifster86 New Member

    I'm so worried about how I am going to graduate this fall. I attend a public university in Texas. I have 22 hrs remaining to graduate but starting this summer to my surprise, I started getting charge out of state tuition. I had no idea of this law! I transferred from a community college and my associates took 18 hrs more that did not transfer towards my BS degree. I also completed a minor, 18 hrs. I also changed my major once and took extra classes that really interested me. I'm already in debt as it is and my bill for this fall is more than 10 K registered for 16 hrs. I am looking to appeal the out of state tuition rate but I'm so afraid I will get denied again and will not be able to graduate. I got denied this summer. I guess i did not submit enough supporting documentation. I just don't know what to submit. My family is very low income. But I am consider and independent student. I currently don't have a job. I took 12 hours last semester to find a full time job but didn't have much luck. I dropped one due to health issues caused by stress.

    All I want to do is graduate and move on! This law of paying out of state tuition which I didn't even know about may prevent me from graduating after coming this far. They have an appeal form they gave me but I don't know what they're looking for to waive it with supporting documentation. I explained that I was very low income and could not afford out of state tuition. I don't know what to do or how I will be able to pay all that by myself when I have nothing. Why don't they warn us about this!? Please advice.
    Melissa Logan and Derrick Logozzo not only don't tell students about financial aid limits (180 credit hours) and limits on in-state tuition (150 credit hours,) but they do tell students not to worry about out of state tuition. Those on financial aid struggle to make it while they are eligible for in-state tuition. In the real world these students are going to enter they will be charged the higher tuition which financial aid does not cover. The vast majority of universities do not offer appeals. A select few universities will offer an appeal for a graduating final semester if there are extenuating circumstances fully documented. Thanks to Logozzo and Logan there are going to be many more tragic posts like this. This student likely never graduated. DCCCD needs to clean house pronto!

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    “The average Texas student graduates with about $30,000 in student debt. Some people don’t understand the magnitude of that. Thirty thousand in the hole when you are getting started in your life is incredibly detrimental,” Williams said.
    Add in out of state tuition and exhausting financial aid which will add thousands and thousands more in debt if the student can even get a loan to cover their semester(s) needed to graduate and it is obvious that DCCCD has completely failed in its mission. Dirty advisors who refuse to follow degree plans must be sent packing.

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    Many Texas college students turning to Sugar Daddies, Mommas for tuition — UT tops list with most ‘Sugar Babies’ | KXAN.com

    DCCCD students are looking for Sugar Daddies and Sugar Mommas on this site. DCCCD has 215 already registered. Thanks to Melissa Logan and Derrick Logozzo advising students into exhausting their financial aid and putting them in out of state tuition there will be many more!

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    A college president’s advice to students: Don’t borrow to pay tuition - MarketWatch
    Opinion: A college president’s advice to students: Don’t borrow to pay tuition

    Published: Feb. 11, 2020 at 8:58 a.m. ET By Walter V. Wendler



    A reality check from the president of a 10,000-student university near Amarillo, Texas

    ...........I heard concerns about the cost of higher education. And my message and response was always the same: “Do not borrow money to attend West Texas A&M University (or any university) for the first two years. If you must borrow, attend community college, but don’t borrow a penny for community college either. Pay as you go.” And I should have added: Live with your parents rent-free as long as possible.


    You might think I was simply on a recruiting tour for the university where I serve as president. Yes, of course, I hoped that my visits helped make the university more appealing. My primary purpose, however, was not recruiting students, but helping them determine a long-range plan to enable them to become what I call “noble citizensready to work, engage, think and vote.


    Seventy percent of college students graduated with debt in 2019 — on average, $30,000.


    Some of those graduates will still be paying off their student loans decades later, when they get Social Security checks — either voluntarily or by having those checks garnished. Of Americans over 60, 2.8 million have student loans. While 73% of those are cosigners paying for children or grandchildren, the rest are students paying off their own education loans.


    Additionally, a growing number of aging Americans have college debt that they will not pay back before dying.
    Default rates for borrowers over 65 are nearly 40%, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.


    Pell Grants, which are federal grants to help low-income students to pay for college, once covered 79% of tuition and fees in 1975 but only covered 29% by 2017 — a downhill slide caused by escalating costs and easy loans....


    In urging students not to take on too much student debt, I also highlighted other paths — aside from college — to noble citizenship: military service, certification programs or family businesses.

    I recognize the responsibility of university leadership to point out the challenges for students and families when borrowing for education. It is difficult for middle-income families to pay the increasing costs of a college education. Informed borrowing is the key issue for students. The need is highlighted for students who are first in their family to attend college and may accept the advice that any college degree is worth whatever it costs. It is not true. And, it is an unfair burden for university leadership to place on students.

    But if students borrow for college, in my view, they should be aware that they are possibly being sucked into what I like to call a troubling triangle of treachery.


    One side of the triangle is represented by elected officials who encourage everyone to go to college.
    The second side is represented by lenders, who — in my view — do little to assess an individual’s ability to repay a student loan. If a student borrows to enroll in a program, limits placed on amounts borrowed are quite high when federal and private loans are combined. And they tend to treat all college degrees, and by inference, employment opportunities as equal. Yet, the employment marketplace reveals that is not the case.


    The third side is represented by university leadership, which — in my view — has not done enough to let students know the pitfalls of borrowing.


    A student’s indebtedness is eventually their own responsibility. Debt responsibility won’t disappear for the student — or for parents who are helping them. It’s their responsibility too.


    Just ask the 44 million Americans, many of whom did not graduate, who owe $1.5 trillion in student loan debt...
    Community college should be two years only! Count those credit hours and take only what is transferable. Ready to work means picking a certificate program or major that will lead to gainful employment, so going to Career Services and the Transfer Center first is paramount.

    Plan now and don't end up getting your Social Security checks garnished for foolish choices. Financial aid doesn't cover in-state tuition well, so be very careful not to take anything that is not on your degree plan.

    DCCCD has music advisors that are discouraging students from going to Career Services, real advisors and the Transfer Center in order to trap them in the music program and fill music department chairs. DCCCD needs to remove those dirty advisors immediately so students can get real help with career choices and advising that will keep them on a degree plan that will lead to gainful employment. Taking excess hours of music nonsense and/or changing majors will lead to mountains of debt and the added catastrophe of out of state tuition on top of it all. Many will accrue that horrendous debt and not even be able to finish a degree. DCCCD needs to have advisors that are looking out for the best interest of the student period!

    This thread shows how predatory and dishonest the advising has been for years in the Richland Music Department!

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm



    Sugar Baby University 2018 - SeekingArrangement

    33,278 views

    •Jan 9, 2018






    Seeking


    18.3K subscribers

    Say goodbye to college debt...and hello to a higher class education! Wish you could spend your spring break jet-setting instead of working your part-time job? Tired of eating ramen for breakfast, lunch, and dinner with no end in sight? Don't work harder - work smarter! Sugar Babies on SeekingArrangement.com receive an average of $2400 per month in allowances and gifts. Go from broke to bespoke and hack the student debt cycle!


    College students and parents need to read this thread from start to finish. Sugar Baby U wouldn't be my first choice!!!!

    NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightmare

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    I am hearing from DCCCD's victims. I will fight until these dirty advisors are gone and DCCCD has announced a plan to cover the out of state tuition for these students that were harmed!

    Replying to @realscamdotcom


    I have gone to DCCCD, and I am so glad you are putting this out here. I am victim of dcccd's unnecessary classes, and have exhausted my financial Aid!!


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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    University of Texas at Arlington says:
    Maverick Marching Band
    Join the Maverick Marching Band and become a member of the UTA family!

    College marching band is a great way to meet new friends from all over campus. Since the cancellation of football 1986, the Maverick Marching Band has toured the region as the ambassadors of the University. You do not need to be a music major to participate in marching band. The band performs at marching contests and Bands of America regionals throughout the Fall. Our members, including our freshmen, were often leaders in their high school programs. Because of this, our rehearsals are fast-paced, productive, and fun!
    One of the most common questions we are asked is, will I have time for this? The answer is yes! Your time is more flexibile in college than in high school. You have attended classes for roughly 40 hours a week for the last 12 years. Now you will attend classes roughly 15-20 hours a week. While more time must be devoted to studying, you still have time for marching band! Here are the statistics to back that up!

    Maverick Marching Band Audition Information

    How do I audition/register for marching band?

    All students (both new and returning) planning on participating in the 2020 marching band should fill out the 2020 intent form. Students who were in the 2019 Maverick Marching Band AND who participated in a Spring Semester concert ensemble at UTA do not need to re-audition. You will also need to register for the appropriate classes. All students with high school marching band experience will be accepted into the Maverick Marching Band.
    When do I audition for marching band?

    There are 3 ways for wind players to audition (Percussion and Colorguard members: Please see below under audition material for information about your audition):

    1. Audition on May 16, 2020 on the UTA campus. This is preferred, but if you are not within 2 hours of campus, please do not make a special trip simply for the marching band audition. The audition will take less than 10 minutes, so please do not drive several hours for this. You can utilize options 2 or 3 below.
    2. You may audition during your New Maverick Orientation or contact Dr. Evans to work out an alternate in-person audition date. A link will be sent to you to schedule a time with your audition music.
    3. If an in-person audition is not possible, please contact Dr. Evans to set-up a video audition.

    What is the audition material?

    Woodwind/Brass: If you were a member of your high school marching band, you will be accepted as a member of the Maverick Marching Band. There will be a small "audition" so that we can assess your current skill level and start the process of writing the music and drill prior to camp. The audition will consist of a few common major scales and a couple of short excerpts from the Fall 2019 TMEA or ATSSB All-Region etudes (emailed to you upon completion of the 2020 intent form). Please do not let the audition intimidate you. If you have high school marching band experience, you are good enough to be a member of the Maverick Marching Band!
    Top rated schools like this encourage students to pursue their passion for music in a healthy way. Everyone with high school band experience is welcome, but unlike the predatory program at Richland, everyone is not pushed into becoming a music major and they take only 1 credit hour of music per semester. They are kept on degree plans and not put in excess hours as UTA charges the higher tuition and does not accept[t waivers. Richland's Music program is a mess and students lives have been ruined by the shady advisors!

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    http://UNT Undergraduate Excess Hours Tuition Calculator for DCCCD


    DEFINITIONS
    Excess Undergraduate Hours Tuition
    Undergraduate students classified as Texas residents and non-resident students paying in-state tuition rates, who initially enrolled fall 1999 and subsequent semesters, with excessive hours will be charged, upon registration, an additional tuition rate per semester credit hour for all enrolled hours.

    Please refer to www.unt.edu/tuition for current tuition and fee information.

    Excessive Hour definition
    Undergraduate students who enrolled initially in the fall 1999 semester or subsequent semesters cannot exceed more than 45 hours of the number of hours required for completion of the degree plan in which they are enrolled. Any hours beyond 45 are considered excessive and will result in additional tuition charges.

    Undergraduate students who enrolled initially in the fall 2006 semester or subsequent semesters cannot exceed more than 30 hours of the number of hours required for completion of the degree plan in which they are enrolled. Any hours beyond 30 are considered excessive and will result in additional tuition charges.

    Excess hours include all transfer work taken from any Texas public institution plus all UNT hours taken through the semester prior to the registration term. Developmental courses and hours earned by the student at a private institution or out-of-state institution do not count towards excess hours.

    Degree plan hours include the total number of hours required for a student to complete his or her degree plan. Questions regarding degree plan hours should be directed to the student’s academic advisor.


    Viewing Your Excess Hours
    1. To view your excess hour status, Go to the Excess Hours page in the UNT Student
    Portal.
    2. The top level fields of the Excess hour page list the summary hours (degree, included, excess), academic level and residency.
    3. Student Type is listed directly below Degree Hours and lists the excess hour status a student is subject to under the excess hour limits for the specified term.



    The Student Type fields list the Student Group code, effective date and description used to classify a student’s current excess hour status for a term:
    CBHN (Enrolled prior to Fall 1999): Not subject to Excessive Hours Tuition.
    CB45 (Excess Hours – 45 Limit): Student was initially enrolled Fall 1999 through
    Summer 2006 and is subject to the 45 excess hour limit.
    NA (Excess Hours – 30 Limit): Student was initially enrolled Fall 2006 or later and is subject to the 30 excess hour limit.
    CBHO (Exceeds Degree Plan Hours): Student currently exceeds degree plan hours and is subject to the rules for excess hour limit.
    CBQ (Excess Hours per CB Notice): The student’s UNT record does not show excessive hours but the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has notified UNT that the student’s hours on record are excessive. Student should be advised to fill
    out the Permission to Release Credit Hours form in the Registrar’s Office to allow follow up with the CB to verify the correct hours.
    CBU (Excess Hours No CB Notice): Student currently exceeds degree plan hours based on records received at the University of North Texas but the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has not indicated that the student has excessive hours based on their record. Student should be advised to fill out the Permission to Release Credit Hours form in the Registrar’s Office to allow follow up with the CB to verify the correct hours.

    4. Program/Plan is a cumulative list of a student’s degree plan information and the hours required to complete the degree plan.
    Career/Program/Plan: Detailed display of all a student’s careers, programs and plan. For example, “Arts and Science, Major BA, Mathematics”.
    Primary Plan Hrs: The hours required to complete the primary major.
    Additional Required Hrs: The additional hours beyond those associated with the
    Primary Plan Hrs that are required for a student to complete a degree plan.

    5. Directly below Program/Plan are the Included Hours. Included displays the total registered hours that are included in determining excessive hours.

    UNT Included Hours: Total UNT registered hours completed through the prior term. Developmental hours are not included in this calculation.
    Transfer Hours: All Texas Public Institutions attended by a student and the total registered hours for each school.
    Hours Excluded: Hours taken by transfer that should not be included in the excessive hour calculation are entered in the Hours Excluded field by the Registrar’s Office. Hours entered in this field will not be included in the total Hours Included field at the top of the page.

    7. In instances when students dispute their excess hours it will be necessary to give the Registrar’s Office permission to access cumulative hour record on file with the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. A release form is available on the next page. If needed please print off this page and submit it to the Registrar Records Office, ESSC 209.

    University of North Texas
    Permission to Release Credit Hours
    The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) permits the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (the State of Texas educational governing entity), with your consent, to disclose to higher education institutions the number of credit hours taken previously. This information is typically used to gather demographic statistics for the purpose of improving educational programs and to determine if students are graduating in a timely manner.
    The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has my permission to report the number of credit hours that I have taken at other institutions.
    Name (printed):
    EMPLID (Student ID):
    EUID:
    Phone:
    Signature Date
    Return completed form: Mailing address:
    UNT Registrar’s Office
    1155 Union Circle #311400
    Denton, TX 76203-5017
    By FAX:
    940-891-6824
    Attn: UNT Registrar’s Office, Records
    To our office:
    UNT Registrar’s Office, Records,
    Eagle Student Services Center, Room 209
    All hours are included that are attempted. Students can't choose what to transfer and no more than 66 credit hours will transfer to UNT. Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board tracks all hours including those from Richland / DCCCD as the rate calculator from UNT above shows. Students can't hide hours. In-state tuition rates are for 1 major only.

    Derrick Logozzo is lying about out of state tuition. It is a reality that cannot be escaped. There is no excuse for exhausting students financial aid and in-state tuition eligibility. It is vital that degree plans be followed exactly!



    I demand that Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan be fired for their predatory advising.


    The Fort Worth Star Telegram got the scoop straight from UNT. Out of state tuition is devastating.

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    Richland College Music Auditions occurring now. Contact us today!




    This Saturday, Richland College Music is hosting online audition appointments for any interested students who are looking to major, minor, or participate in music at Richland in the Fall. Students are able to perform live in approved video conferencing platforms and/or send audition videos. Special appointments for other dates are also available.
    Information can be found at www.richlandcollege edu/music
    Instrumentalists contact Derrick Logozzo at
    derricklogozzo dcccd.edu
    Vocalists contact Melissa Logan at
    melissalogan dcccd.edu



    ​ ​Spring 2020 classes have resumed online. All physical facilities are closed to the public at this time and employees are working remotely.Please visit dcccd.edu/coronavirus for additional information and to find contact information for various departments.If you need additional assistance, pl...


    These rogue advisors are not advising students honestly. They put students into dozens of hours that do not transfer, apply to nothing and do not lead to gainful employment. These advisors use up all of students financial aid and land them in out of state tuition at their own Texas Universities with in many cases over 100 credit hours of music nonsense.

    Real music schools invite students that participated in their high school music programs to come in and play or sing in an ensemble (1 credit hour.) Real schools do not encourage everyone to become a music major and do not admit students to the program that haven't passed a rigorous audition and screening process. Real schools follow degree plans to the letter and don't put students into excess hours that will leave them having to pay out of state tuition (which financial aid does not cover) or using up the hours eligible for financial aid on classes that don't apply to a degree that will lead to a real job.

    Any students that is interested in music should first get with Career Services so they understand what jobs are available and the earning potential of said. Students should then go to the real advisors and the Transfer Center to get truthful information. The student should contact the schools they are interested in transferring to and make certain that they have the qualifications, background and skills to make it as a music major before wasting a single credit hour at Richland or anywhere else. Financial aid does not cover out of state tuition and financial aid is routinely exhausted with nonsense music garbage by the Richland advisors who are only interested in filling their own chairs and getting $$$$$ into the department.



    Students should carefully plan out their two years and only take what is on the degree plan that will transfer and complete their Associate's Degree (60 credit hours) that transfers as a block. Only 66 hours total will transfer, so nothing outside of the degree plan should be taken without the accepting college requiring it! Walking out of Richland with 100-161 hours and not transferring or getting an Associate's Degree .... nothing to show for it is devastating. Being one the the very few that transfer and then getting slammed with a bill for out of state tuition is horrific! Don't get bamboozled by Melissa Logan and Derrick Logozzo as so many others have.

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

    DCCCD apparently employs comedians to write what they post on their website. The employees are very successful if one defines that as a free for all with no accountability and includes the taxpayers funding a what is a big blow-out party. That big blowout party leaves taxpayers with armies of students that do not finish degrees or certificates but accrue dozens of credit hours that do use up all of their financial aid eligibility and put them in out of state tuition at their own Texas Universities. Taxpayers are funding trips, extravagant events and dinners to recruit statewide and beyond for a program that should be working to serve Dallas County in a fiscally responsible manner.

    It is only a two year program. Derrick Logozzo and Melissa Logan are still forcing students into classes that don't exist, won't transfer and that will use up their financial aid and put them in out of state tuition at 4 year Texas Universities. The administration acknowledges that this is a problem and stated that would be rectified. But as the Fall 2020 course listing below show, the free for all to fill chairs with mostly unqualified and trusting students that will take what they are told without questioning it continues to the catastrophic harm of the innocent students. The music program at Richland should be a mirror of the first two years of a real college program for highly qualified, transfer capable students only and then to serve the local community with music opportunities. Other colleges in the Dallas College system do recording /audio technology, organ, vocal jazz, church bells and many other specialized music programs which should only be offered at one location in Dallas County to save money.

    The focus in the Richland Music Department is signing every warm body up as a music major to fill chairs and get $$$ with no regard to whether the students will be able to transfer or find gainful employment. DCCCD is destroying lives and ruining students and their families financially with music and other nonsense courses that do not lead to gainful employment or transfer to real programs at four year universities. At DCCCD no one seems to be in charge and there is almost no communication. The dirty, predatory advising in the music department is acknowledged all over campus and to to the top of the conu=fused and ineffective food chain such as it is, but the head of advising whines that she has no authority over advisors??? Fine Arts Dean, Diane Hilbert, has had this horrific mess dumped in her lap numerous times and was supposed to make recommendations in line with the VP Donna Walker promising that students would be advised according to degree plans (Guided Pathways) and that it would be monitored. DCCCD is a totally disorganized mess and is clearly not spending our tax dollars wisely!
    Board Thematic Priorities

    Employee Success

    Every star student, thriving program or new initiative in the district begins with our employees. They are the movers and the shakers who truly make things happen. That’s why we ensure our employees have the tools, resources, training — everything they need — to do their job and do it well. When employees are successful, everything else follows.



    Student Success

    To us, student success is key. Our processes and policies are created with students in mind, and we work tirelessly to make sure their individual needs are met. From walking students through the steps of financial aid to encouraging risk-taking and innovation in the classroom, we are student-focused and student-friendly.



    Community Engagement

    The population and industries of Dallas County are diverse, and so are their needs. DCCCD seeks opportunities to engage with our community, both to foster its growth and support its growing pains. We want to be the problem solver for our community. A place people can go when they need help the most.



    Institutional Effectiveness

    We’re growing, but are we effective? Are we meeting the needs of our community, our students and our employees? DCCCD is continually looking at how we can better personalize, align and scale our services. Currently that means examining our operational model and seeing how we can function as a network to make sure students get the right services at the right time, every time.


    Who is approving these students being forced into these classes that don't exist? At every other music school Voice Masterclasses are built in to the lessons and not a separate class that the student has to pay for that wastes their instate-tuition and rockets them into out of state tuition.

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    Re: NASM Accredited??? DCCCD Richland College Music Advising Derrick Logozzo / Melissa Logan Out of State Tuition Nightm

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    None of that is on the degree plan at any music school and it is not transferable, wastes in-state tuition hours and rockets students into out of state tuition. Students who are qualified to major in music always start in college level music theory and real ensembles. Those who are going to make it in music will work hard and get through the real theory. This is just a really dirty way to trap students in a program for an extra year to fill chairs at the students horrific expense.
    Last edited by Soapboxmom; 05-17-2020 at 10:40 PM.

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